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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What can I say, I learn faster when I actually SEE how it's done... :rolleyes:

I'd like to re-upholster a minibike seat (19 inches long), much like a Triumph seat. I'd like to integrate a white 'piping' in the perimeter, maybe a pleated top? And yes, I'd like to do it myself...

I DO have a basic idea of how I will go about it, but pics, methods and techniques would be welcomed.

Any input, fellas?

whizzerick
 

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I've got an upholstey book that shows how to do motorcycle seats with piping. What does the seat you want to do look like? is it pretty much just a rectangle or is it contoured and shaped like a motorcycle seat?

I'll help you out as best I can.

Later,
Jay
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the reply.
It's basically a slightly tapered rectangle with rounded corners (no seam at the corners), the white piping I know how to make (vinyl strip folded over cord):


A pleated top would be nice, but difficult?

KnuckleBuster said:
I've got an upholstey book that shows how to do motorcycle seats with piping. What does the seat you want to do look like? is it pretty much just a rectangle or is it contoured and shaped like a motorcycle seat?
I'll help you out as best I can.
Jay
 

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The name of the book is Automotive Upholstery Handbook by Don Taylor. It's from California Bill's Automotive Handbooks - ISBN 1-931128-00-6. Should be able to find it at Barnes and Noble or Borders.

Whizzerick - that looks like an easy seat to do. Pleats are actually pretty easy, especially on a shape that simple. You pretty much just cut the top piece longer than you need, sew together the vinyl, some foam, and a backing, and voila! Cut a strip for the sides/front/back and sew it all together.

If you want, I can PM you the step by step instructions with pictures. It may take me a little while to get some scans, but it shouldn't be a big deal. In return you can tell me more about your foundry setup - I think I'm ready to start messing with some casting.

Later,
Jay
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
KnuckleBuster said:
I think I'm ready to start messing with some casting.
Later,
Jay
Jay, thanks for the offer but I dont want to waste your time.
I'll just 'wing it' and I'm confident I'll be A-Ok. Maybe not 'Fatlucky' Ok... :)

I'll PM you a write-up on seting up the small foundry.
Foundry season is upon us... Time to fire-up the ol'furnace!
 

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whizzerick said:
Jay, thanks for the offer but I dont want to waste your time.
I'll just 'wing it' and I'm confident I'll be A-Ok. Maybe not 'Fatlucky' Ok... :)

I'll PM you a write-up on seting up the small foundry.
Foundry season is upon us... Time to fire-up the ol'furnace!
It's pretty straight forward. Paper patterns are very helpful. Just allow about half an inch past the seam for selvege. When you round a corner (radius, not 90 degree) you may have to make cuts outside the seam almost up to the seam, but not into it so that the fabric doesn't bunch. 90 degree turns, you just leave the needle through the fabric, lift the foot, turn the fabric, lower the foot and cotinue sewing. I really haven't done much sewing, I'm still playing around and learning, but I like to learn by doing - so what if you screw up, it's just for fun, right?

You had sent me some tips on Green Sand over on the HAMB, so I've got that info - how 'bout the furnace?

Thanks and good luck!
Jay
 

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I'm not sewing leather yet. I just use heavy vinyl that I bought from a fabric store. The machine I'm using is just a good old fashioned Singer that's been handed down through the generations (think it was my great-grandmother's). The best kind of machine for this kind of work is one with a walking foot - it pinches the fabric together and moves it along, then releases it as the needle comes down and makes the stitch - then it repeats. If you aren't sewing a thick amount of material it's not a real big deal.

Pfaf is supposed to make an exceptional machine, but the price reflects this. Sometimes they show up on ebay for a reasonable price.

Is the tension on the thread set correctly? If not, it could cause broken threads nearly all the time. You should have two tensioners: one for the spool and one for the bobbin. If they are both too tight, the material will bunh up and the thread will break. If they are both too loose, the stitches will look loose. If the tensions are not the same, the stitch will favor one side of the material or the other - in other words, the place where the two threads loop will either be towards the front or the back of the peice rather than right between the two pieces of material.

Hope this helps...

Later,
Jay
 
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