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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
1. After the bike has been sitting for a couple of days, it seems really hard to start.
After I prime the ticklers, give a couple twists of the throttle I takes a bunch of kicks and more and more priming to get going, once running and warm, the bike starts 1st kick every time.

2. Again, once sitting for a few days, I go to kick the bike over and the kick seems to have a dead spot (not cycling the engine). Every couple kicks it seems to not catch just kind of stops in mid kick. I have read other posts saying it could be the plates sticking together. If I take tension off the cable at the lever it seems to help and cycle the engine 90% of the time. Once I have the bike running and tension back on the cable, problem solved. kicks perfect every time.

These 2 issues seem to work against each other and me.
Any advice would be great.
thanks
 

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Might not be the plates sticking, sounds like the adjustment on the cable is too tight. You might be holding the pressure plate out just a hair and when you release the cable adjustment, it goes to a "normal" position. That would explain the mushy kicking too.

Run through a whole clutch adjustment procedure and see if that helps any.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Stupid me,Thanks for the tip. I loosened off the cable and so far so good. Cycles all the way through and didn't realize I could run it without that little tension. Now for the hard starts when cold.
 

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you need to push down on the ticklers until gas comes pouring out, and it doesn't do any good to give the throttle any twists, there are no accelerator pumps on Amal carburetors, just turn the switch on hold the throttle about 1/4 open and kick it as hard and fast as you can.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I always prime them until fuel pours out. I will try the 1/4 turn method. I guess I just got spoiled on how easy it used to start, but at that time the carbs were set way too rich and I was fouling tons of plugs. Thanks Tony.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yeah My timing has been static timed for quite some time. I have spoken with some triumph guru's in the area and they assured me this was the only way back in the day. It rides and pulls fine. Just that initial start up is a bitch.
 

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is your oil the correct weight? because my dad did that to his T120R once, he accidentally put the wrong weight in and it wouldn't start
 

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If a Triumph (or any bike for that matter) is set up properly not only will it start cold in one or two kicks but you don't need to kick it at all hard -- just push on the kickstarter enough to turn the engine over and it should fire right up. That's the way my 70 Bonnie starts.

Starting when cold:
1. Free up clutch (Put bike in 3rd gear, pull in clutch and rock bike back and forth until clutch frees, or use kick starter)
2. Tickle until it floods,
3. Put just enough weight on kick starter to turn the engine over a quarter turn or so (that will usually suck some fumes into one of the combustion chambers)
4. Push on kicker hard enough to turn engine over.

That's it. No need to kick hard, jump on the kicker or any other dramatic antics. A properly tuned engine will fire up simply by turning it over against compression. Clean plugs are important, not just clean, but properly gapped for whatever ignition system you're using-- points ignitions require less gap at the plugs than electronic.

If you have to jump up and down on your kickstarter to get your bike to start, something's wrong. Just watch someone hand prop an airplane engine, all they do is turn it over against compression and it fires up.
 

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Here's my procedure for starting.....works everytime! Fuel on, hold in clutch lever and slowly push kicker down ensuring engine DOES NOT turn (may take a few gentle kicks if it sat long enough). Flood the carb. With ignition off, one good kick. With ignition still OFF, gently push kicker down to feel for compression stroke. Once you get there, ignition on, one kick with good follow through and she's running.
Another note on starting. If at all possible, keep your foot that isn't on the kicker on the ground. The idea is to not put any extra weight on the kickstand.
Regarding your clutch, what Wes was referring to is adjusting the clutch push rod. Adjusting your cable will have very little effect unless the pushrod is properly adjusted first.
Hope this helps!
Johnny
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I have adjusted the clutch many times and seems to be better then get worse with time. I do have a leak from the primary case which I keep having to top up, I know change the gasket..... would low case oil have an effect on the clutch?
 

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Curtis
If there is tension on the cable, the pushrod will wear a hole in the adjuster and or the mushroom thing in the outer gearbox cover. They can cause a lot of grief if they are worn out. The pushrod adjustment needs to be done with the cable free of the lever. Then you can reattach the cable to the lever and take up most of the slack but it needs almost 1/8" of free play. Also make sure the cable is routed well without any drastic bends and that it does not bind when the bars are turned. A worn out cable will also give you problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks, I know that the tension at both ends of the cable have to be slackened off for the rod adjustment . I just re-adjusted the rod again with 1 full turn backed off before nut is cinched down (as manual says). I will give her a run this afternoon and see how it goes.
 

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1 full turn is really a lot. Also you have to devise a way to hold the screw in place as you tighten the nut, which I do with a socket that I ground down 2 flats on so that you can hold it with a wrench while using a screwdriver down the center.
 

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A few things concern me. First of all what year is the motor? When you say you top the primary how much do you put in? If it is a later motor the primary will self level with engine oil. It only takes 350cc from completly dry to be at spec. 1/4 turn is what I use on my clutch. Have you ever been through the primary and determined if the clutch plates are in decent condition? How old and fucked up is the cable? What clutch lever configuration are you running?

Granted these motors are basicly 1930's technology, but they also ned to be set up correctly from the get go. Answer some of these questions and we can help you much better.

What year is it???? What manual are you getting your data from?

dale
 
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