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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I understand there were problems with the tin covers on electric start setups, has anyone fabricated a satisfactory reinforcement for them?


Edit: I wasnt very clear in the initial post, this is about the aftermarket tin covers on a 1984 shovel cast aluminum OEM electric start inner primaries. Apologies for lack of details.
 

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In what way you mean problems? I recall i had to re-locate the bush containing the needle bearing outwards by 5 mm or some , perhaps that was specific to my set up but that was the only fitment isseu i had.
 

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I worked in the shops when these first showed up. And of-course there were good ones and cheap ass knock offs. The good ones had extra reinforcement in the starter shaft bearing location, inspection cover hole and around mounting flange. The bad ones ripped the bearing out of the cover, had chrome problems, oil leaks and vacuum leaks (The stock oiling system oiled the primary chain thru the vent line and returned the oil with the return side of the oil pump. A leak would prevent return and the primary would flood.)
 

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The tin primary in and out is cut up to do this with some kits - tin o primary is a hard tail or 58 / 64 type have pictures and cycle tech in Phily make a Indian Larry starter that mount under the tins but you need the belt drive they sell all become money top picture

the ww kit on Germany is the best one available in the world but not cheap - mike in calif - on the site can get it for you if your in the states bottom pictures
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I worked in the shops when these first showed up. And of-course there were good ones and cheap ass knock offs. The good ones had extra reinforcement in the starter shaft bearing location, inspection cover hole and around mounting flange. The bad ones ripped the bearing out of the cover, had chrome problems, oil leaks and vacuum leaks (The stock oiling system oiled the primary chain thru the vent line and returned the oil with the return side of the oil pump. A leak would prevent return and the primary would flood.)
Some of this is what I had heard, the covers cracked some from flexing, and starter drive parts didnt last well since they didnt have a solid stop when extended in starter drive engaged mode. I didnt know there were different quality ones. The ones Ive seen when searching say kick start only, so they are not saying if it even has any of the parts for electric start stuff. Anyway, I wonderd if anyone had made a reinforced part or area of the tin cover to alleviate the flex and associated problems. This would be for use with the 84 shovel project bike thats getting gen right case and pan heads. It already has all the working electric start parts, just trying to make it a bit nicer looking on the left side.

The question is oriented around the aftermarket tin covers used on aluminum OEM inner primaries. I didnt specify very well when initially posting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks. Yes, I understand there are ways to add electric start to older bikes. The Cannonball kits for older type bikes cost over half the cost of the entire '84 bike. If the tin cover on aluminum inner isnt or cant be made a practical setup, it will have to stay the regular aluminum outer. I can live with it, its just not as interesting looking as the tin style. The 84 already has all the electric start stuff, a tin cover is a relatively inexpensive way to add some looks and character if it could be made to work reliably. My budget is limited, Im trying to make stuff work within my modest means. That sometimes means long waits to make any changes (took a year and a half to get all the sidecar mount parts figured out and bought and finally set up). Im riding it as much as I can in the mean time and try not to start any projects I cant finish expeditiously.
 

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I understand there were problems with the tin covers on electric start setups, has anyone fabricated a satisfactory reinforcement for them?
I'm not sure if you have solved this but I put a TechCycle electric starter on my 1947. I will try to send you a photo of the finished product and a couple from the process, and if this is what you are looking for, I can send you multiple photos of the process that may help you through the installation. This is on a hand made trike I built, so I probably had more flexibility than you have, but, this makes the starter rigid as any bolted to a cast inner primary. This does not flex. It is not attached to the inner. I worked around that.
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Yes, thanks. Thats the type.
They are tins so they will never be that firm ,if you dont care for the chrome finish you can tac in some ribs in every here and there, besides the bearing seating might need some adjustment they line up okay with the dowel pin and bolt pattern. If you have some savings left you might wanna consider the BAKER tin type primary …..or is that just ‘jet set’ customizing?
 

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I'm not sure if you have solved this but I put a TechCycle electric starter on my 1947. I will try to send you a photo of the finished product and a couple from the process, and if this is what you are looking for, I can send you multiple photos of the process that may help you through the installation. This is on a hand made trike I built, so I probably had more flexibility than you have, but, this makes the starter rigid as any bolted to a cast inner primary. This does not flex. It is not attached to the inner. I worked around that. View attachment 273329



View attachment 273326 View attachment 273327 View attachment 273328
How about do a thread on your install and post lots of pictures.
 

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How about do a thread on your install and post lots of pictures.
How about do a thread on your install and post lots of pictures.
I will do that, starting next week. Be advised, I have a TON of photos, showing almost every step along the way, including fabrication, welding, powder coating, so I will send photos in more than one message; I think that would be best.
 

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I will do that, starting next week. Be advised, I have a TON of photos, showing almost every step along the way, including fabrication, welding, powder coating, so I will send photos in more than one message; I think that would be best.
cool, we love detailed pictures & 'how to' tips....
 

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Yes it would. With clarifying text, if you feel like supplying some. (Text can be particularly helpful in posts where the resident JJ software goblin turns your images upside down or sideways.)

... Oops, Large-Bore* Pete snuck in ahead of me.

* And, okay, I guess I have to add "Long-Stroke" to his description, much as I don't want to.
 

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Yes it would. With clarifying text, if you feel like supplying some. (Text can be particularly helpful in posts where the resident JJ software goblin turns your images upside down or sideways.)

... Oops, Large-Bore* Pete snuck in ahead of me.

* And, okay, I guess I have to add "Long-Stroke" to his description, much as I don't want to.
Yes it would. With clarifying text, if you feel like supplying some. (Text can be particularly helpful in posts where the resident JJ software goblin turns your images upside down or sideways.)

... Oops, Large-Bore* Pete snuck in ahead of me.

* And, okay, I guess I have to add "Long-Stroke" to his description, much as I don't want to.
I have looked at my build photos, there about 200 of them related to the TechCycle starter and how I got there. I can send a few at a time, or if someone smarter than I am can tell me how to set them up so people who are interested in this can look at all of them, I would give that a try. I built the trike frame using a pan front part and modifying the rear to be kinda like a Servi-car because I used a Servi-car rear axle turned upside down to get the chain on the left side, this process required me to fabricate a lot of parts. The bike is all powder coated, no paint. I powder coated the small parts and had the frame and other parts done by a local powder coat firm. I have sorted the photos based on the date taken, so believe this would be in order. The photos we are discussing do not include the trike frame build, I have close to a 1,000 photos of that process. The photos attached show the first photo I have when it was a concept and the finished photo with the trike on the deck.
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Figured out how to do this, I think. Joined Vimeo and am making slide shows of the still photos. This first one is a test that I did on the 1947 build. I am sending this, but next up will be the TechCycle conversion photos, as requested. Those will come in several links because I must now build those. I will number them, as I have this one. If there is any interest in the 1947 build, I will continue with that project and work through the stills, incorporate them into MP4 and send them. This is a good winter project to work in around other winter work. Maybe what I've done will be helpful to someone else. If anyone has questions, please ask and I will try to answer. The donor frame was from a Pan that I put into a Paughco chopper frame for the owner. He gave me the frame after his bike was done because it was a little bent. Since the stock Harley frame was bent, I set it up "straight" and welded it. Front and rear wheels run true and straight because I did the weld to force the angle out of the frame. That is why you will see all the strange "jig" I set up.

With any luck, that is the first of the 1947 build. I am learning this.
 
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