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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'll take a detail photo of the bracket on the bike.

I had springs on the seat, but it felt too sloppy with the swingarm too, so I hard-mounted it. It is weird that from the side, it looks like it is floating, and the placement looks weird on its own, but is comfortable for me.

My favorite part are the muffler clamps. I wanted to get it done this weekend, and Advance Auto is my closest parts source. I will get it done right shortly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Flatironmike said:
cool

see you at Marcus Dairy tomorrow morning, should be a good crowd with the weather finally turning around....
I'll get legal this week and hopefully be out next week.

Here is the bracket on the bike.
 

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Good thing it is a plate/light bracket. Better get those stray wires under control.


A little tip or two on your welding if you don't mind....

Your welds should look like this --> ((((((((((((((((() left to right pass.

To get that you have to be rythmic and consistent. You want to start your welds on the "toe line" which is where the two pieces of parent metal meet. There should be a bevel on each of those pieces facing each other, not too much, about half way is okay at about a 45* angle. Position the gun with your forearm parallel to the floor, keep that elbow up as you make your pass, consistency! Now, when you start the arc you are going to be going forward left to right but you are going to do a little back tracking if you will. You start welding in the toe line and you are heating the parent metal but you go back about a half nozzle width to make the pool of filler material and parent material mix. The point of going forward and then back is to heat the metal up and then fill it back in. You are in essence making a little hole and then backfilling it with new material. You will get a rythm and you will be able to see the puddle okay and actually watch the metal cool into how it is supposed to look. What your rythm is depends on experience, material thickness and machine settings. The only way you can get it down is to practice... Good luck.
 
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