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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Okay, I said I would post it so here goes. Don't reply or comment until I'm done. Thanx!

The topic:
Get your Triumph Hardtail Aligned correctly

What you need:
-A motorcycle and hardtail:rolleyes:
-Long, accurage straight edge
-a buble level with a straight edge
-string
-couple of heavy weights (concrete blocks will work)
-general handtools
-drill
-hand file
-couple c-clamps
-LOTS OF PATIENCE!!

The ultimate idea here is to get your chains running true and your bike going straight down the road. In this case a late model (duplex frame) Pre-unit Triumph frame and drive train were the lab rats. An MAP cycle hardtail was used and was perfect for this article because it had a lot of problems right out of the box. Thankfully it was welded square, but the holes were simply jigged and drilled wrong somewhere along the way. The result was a hardtail that was throwing the wheel to the left causing mis-alignment in the rear drive chain. Here's what was going on and what SHOULD have been going on.

The drawing is not to scale, but gives the general idea of what the problem is.

Now, how to fix it. Overall the concept is pretty simple, but took some thinking of how to do it without really taring things apart.

First thing is first. You really need your motor (or motor and trans if pre-unit) to be in the frame and have a good drive chain and the wheel installed with all the correct components.

Next, get the bike in a solid position by any mean necesary. If you have a pre-unit, make sure your trans mainshaft and crankshaft are aligned parallel so the primary runs perfect (not covering that here). This will be important so the drive sprockets can be parallel.

Next, get the bike level and plumb. Use an engine component that you know needs to be perpendicular or parallel with the rear axle. In my case I used the crank shaft. I know ultimately it had to be aligned with the rear axle. Once the bike is plumb you can use this to get the alxe level and the hardtail plumb. After things are level and plumb, pick a spot on the motor or primary that you know will be in-line with the rear drive chain. This surface will be used to set up your string.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Okay. Here's what things will look like.

Set up your string with the straight edge:
My "in-line" spot

Here's the straight edge:


Run the string to a point that won't move and won't get in your way. Make sure that the string stays parallel with the straight edge!! Everything will be based off the string. Check your measurements along the string until you're confident it's parallel. Use a good/accurate ruler to do this. A carpenters square with ruler will be helpful here to run down the straight edge to check measurements.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Okay, now that you're string should be set-up. Go back and RE-CHECK!!! This needs to be right!

Now that you know it's right we can continue!

From here you can find out just how far off your alignment is. In my case I was off by quite a bit. The wheel seemed to be to the left (drive side) about 5/16 to 1/2 an inch. That's a lot and it was made very apparent by the "jumping" and binding of the chain as the wheel was turned.

To find out where things need correcting, I pulled the bolts out of the right lower mounting point and slid the top bolt out enough to drop the right side out of position. This allowed the hardtail to pivot/hinge about the left side bolts. The two large gears in the picture above were used to hold the position of the wheel (left to right) to make it "theoretically" aligned. A magnetic level was used to help keep the hardtail plumb


Now to figure out HOW MUCH it's off to the fraction of an inch. Prepare for patience, measuring, tool throwing, a brief exorcism using lots of foul language and just a hell of a lot of adjusting!!!

Use the rear sprocket/drum as your comparison plane. This sprocket needs to be in-line and perfectly parellel with the planer face of the drive sprocket on the transmission mainshaft. Knowing that the string SHOULD be parallel with the trans drive sprocket measure from the string to the sprocket face. The sprocket teeth should be the same thickness. If they're not, take note of the difference. You will need to account for this difference when measuring the rear. Use a good/accurate ruler. Use the same side of the string each time you measure.

Now, move the rear sprocket/drum (keeping it level/plumb) until the measurement is the same on the rear as it is on the drive sprocket.


NOTE: You will need to measure the front and back of the rear sprocket (before and aft the axle/drum)!! Use the wheel adjusters until the wheel is square and the measurements come out the same.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Now check out your holes in the hardtail in relation to the holes in the frame. Here's how mine were off.



Now you should have a good idea of how much you need to alter and "repair" the holes to get things lined up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Now the fun begins!! Remember what I said about exorcisms, throwing tools and a lot of patience???!!! UGGG!!!

Alter your holes in the hardtail until you can get the bolts back in and the tail end is still aligned correctly with your string. Check as you go! This will be the time consuming part, but it is crucial to take your time and do it right. I didn't have a reamer small enough to get in the holes so I used and aggresive hand/rat tail file to get in the holes.

THIS SUCKED! Be careful not to screw up the threads/holes in your frame! You don't want to re-thread anything!

With all the filing, rechecking, filing, rechecking, filing rechecking I finally got things lined up. You have to tighten the bolts up all the way each time because you're checking how it will be when it's tightened up and finished. I found it easiest to just use a c-clamp for the top instead of tightening it each time. One less bolt to worry about.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
After you've got the holes slotted and you KNOW your numbers are right and all is aligned... the worst is over! Now you need something to take up the gap you just moved so the hardtail won't move BACK! You can do this by making a shim or spacer, but welding in the holes would be best if you have the means to do so.
Here's the lower holes slotted before filling (sorry so dark):

Here's after:


http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b394/scootermcrad/Hardtail alignment/DSC01998.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The same was done on the top.

From here, you should be able to bolt things up for a finished product. You still should do one last check of your measurements before you start putting everything back together.

Once you've done the final check, put the chain on and see how things turn out.

I know this isn't EXACTLY your bike, but it's one way of doing an alignment. This worked for me, but use your own discression when giving this a go. You may need to do something different. Things are certainly going to be different if you have a Unit construction bike. But, the same theory applies.

Hopefully this helps someone get down the road a little safer! Feel free to shoot me a PM if you have any questions or if you need more details feel free to comment and I'll post them. Hopefully it's clear what I was doing.

CHEERS!!
Scooter
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
HAAAA!!! The timing gears and bearing are for my TT10000000650R6 with 20-speed gear box!! :D You should see the PISTONS!!! :D

Actually the gears are from a Waukasha (sp?) 6-cylinder motor the size of a VW Beetle. Those gears must weigh in at about 40 lb a piece! Crazy! One is a cam gear and the other is an accessory gear. I also have a couple crank gears and the idler gears!! The bearing is from the impeller of a HUGE water pump. The pump is about the size of a VW also! It was hooked up to a 5000 HP electric motor! Two of those bearings were used for the impeller and that was one of them. Serious business.
caffeine said:
great post! i wanna know about that big ass bearing,

what the hell kinda stroker triumph motor are you building with those two cam gear and that big ass mainbearing!?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Hey Brotha'!! I didn't get to your package yet. It was a crazy weekend! Had a few people interested in the Model A this weekend. kept me pretty busy. I'll get on your stuff tonight man! Things have been nuts!! Don't mean to keep you waiting. :eek: PM me when you get a chance!

Flyin' Dutchman said:
Scott!! You crazy motherfucker!! Did you check my goodies already....?? ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Man, I suck at spelling! Sorry everyone! Please disregard the spelling and gramatical errors! If Ryan gets us a spell check like he did on the HAMB I just might be able to write things that make sense... I didn't do so well in grammer school, so when they came out with spell check it saved my life! :D Don't need no steenking dictionary!
 

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Sorry its not related to the tech, but where did you get your oil filter set up?
 
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