Jockey Journal Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
376 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i've been thinkin' about home fabbin' a hardtail for my '66 bsa. i'm not underestimating the amount of work involved, but the fabrication looks straightforward enough. seems like if you mount the frame on something solid (bolt it to a table top for instance) and mark the centerline on the table you can keep things in line; both side to side and up/down. makin' the axle plates will take a while to get right on. 'course most of us have a friend or two with a mill in their shop that should make that aspect go easier. or even send a drawing to one of the shops that laser cut steel and get them that way.

there's the minefield, though. i'm sure you folks have all seen a bike or car butchered during a job that "looked" easy. like rakin' a bike neck or subframing a hot rod. i bet the butchers all thought they could do the job right, but for one reason or another it just didn't work out.

so here's the point:

would someone do a tech article on making a hard-tail for a bike? we all would like to see how someone else approaches this. pro; first-timer; or anywhere in between. i'm sure i would. what are the pitfalls a novice needs to watch out for? tubing wall thickness recommendations? methods of bending tubing? axle plate thickness? max length for a chain? mig/tig/stick? etc.?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
219 Posts
atch said:
thanx brian.

anyone got anything to add?
No problem. These are good questions!

would someone do a tech article on making a hard-tail for a bike? we all would like to see how someone else approaches this. pro; first-timer; or anywhere in between. i'm sure i would. what are the pitfalls a novice needs to watch out for? tubing wall thickness recommendations? methods of bending tubing? axle plate thickness? max length for a chain? mig/tig/stick? etc.?
I too would like to hear some folks personal techniques out there.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top