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OK TECH me. I've got a cone shovel, ratchet top 4 spd and a 1 1/2" open belt. I'm gonna need a new dry clutch set up REAL soon. When my bike is COLD(like now, winter) it shifts smooth as butter. But when it warms up, I'm SLAMMIN gears. I'm just looking for an all around solid clutch or maybe I only need new plates OR it's adjusted very poorly!? Doesn't need to be big bucks race clutch or cheap brand X. What do you think is the best clutch value for my application? Thanks ahead of time.
 

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Built2Ride said:
Does it matter, I've got jockey shift/ foot clutch?
I think it's been covered before, but you might want to us an early model throwout bearing or put some sort of stop on your clutch. You can put a lot more pressure on a throwout bearing with leg power than they were intended to take. A hand clutch won't "bottom them out", but unless a foot clutch is designed right it will.
 

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Atomic Custom
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Larry T said:
I think it's been covered before, but you might want to us an early model throwout bearing or put some sort of stop on your clutch. You can put a lot more pressure on a throwout bearing with leg power than they were intended to take. A hand clutch won't "bottom them out", but unless a foot clutch is designed right it will.
Very good point.

I am running the early "bell" throwout bearing in ED now. I have had problems in the past with late style chucking the C clip, even with the clutch setup to NOT bottom out. When you are thrashing gears, you tend to stomp the clutch and bingo.. out comes the C clip.
 

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A friend ran a Scorption clutch on his Ironhead, and was very happy with it. I'd be curious to hear which one you choose, and how it ends up working out for you. I'm working on a 4-speed, cone shovel and will need to get a new clutch set up some time in the near future.
 

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mucho-rake
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rockymtnpits said:
Very good point.

I am running the early "bell" throwout bearing in ED now. I have had problems in the past with late style chucking the C clip, even with the clutch setup to NOT bottom out. When you are thrashing gears, you tend to stomp the clutch and bingo.. out comes the C clip.
im not running the bell but tom swears by em.

but to the point of leg power vs hand power yes you have to adjust / place a stop so its just enough throw for engagement disengagement or you will chew up the late styles.

and i loves my rivera, once you go rivera you'll never go back. so smooove
 

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If you have the extra money go to the primo, If you don't a couple of idea's
to try would be using the plastic retainer that is held in by snap rings, rather
then the stock clips. They sell for about $15,it is a cheap way to keep the
clutch shell from walking off the the hub especially if the bearings are a little loose. Another advantage to using this little gem is,when an open primary
is the option to use, the bearings must be greased, since there is no oil in the primary to do the job, and it help's keep the grease off the clutch plates. If a
chain is being used make sure it is as square as possible, even with an open primary,I used to line everything up with a modified inner primary, Many times I have seen the later tranny's with the flat bottom cock just enough to
misalign the shafts, the earlier tranny's that were designed to run with the unsupported tin primaries sat into the tranny plate locking them into the proper position, with motors and tires both getting bigger,the alignment now
becomes even more crucial to proper clutch adjustment.I have found the old style stock clutch,setup with the proper plates and disks,
that were checked for flatness,worked just fine for me for many years,if the time was taken to do it right,don't try to save money here if the plate is warped shitcan it,if it is still possible to find the early plates with the wider
friction surface grab them, the extra metal supports the plate,and dissipates the heat, making it less prone to warp,because of its added stiffness,now back to the question at hand,most of the adjustment problems stem from,
alignment,chain tightness,and finally adjusting the clutch cold, and then trying to compensate after the clutch has been run,heating it up,which
expands everything,which is what heat does,then when the bike is started the next time,it can,t be put into gear because the clutch parts have contracted back not allowing the plates to be seperated enough to disengage the tranny,
so the clutch is adjusted again starting the insanity all over again.This procedure also works well with the primo,just remember to let the clutch cool
right down after that first ride,then adjust it should be good to go,if not,put the bike in gear,start pulling in the clutch as the bike is being kicked thru,
when the kick arm moves free that is roughly were the clutch is realeasing,
if it doesn't get the book and start over,good luck.Jurneyman
 
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