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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
This is my first tech here on the JJ, and my 1st bike build. Hope I'm doing things right! My choice of tail light made it necessary to make make my rear fender adjustable so that I could move it when I adjust the rear wheel. The tail light is a roof light from a '40 Mack fire truck and it's pretty long, so my fender hangs down behind the wheel enough that it would rub if the fender was solid mounted and I needed to move the wheel back to tighten the chain. The only thing I could come up with was a way to move the fender too.
I started by posting this crappy drawing of my idea on the JJ in hopes someone would add to my idea or tell me what wouldn't work:


Didn't hear otherwise, so I started into it.
First I took two lengths of 1/2" heater hose and taped them to the inside of the fender for proper spacing. I've heard others use 3/8", but I don't really know how much these Avons will grow when they're turning. It looks close enough to the tire for me and I can adjust the clearance closer if I want this way anyhow!
Based on my drawing from the day before, I started measuring and making parts. It's important to note here that your rear tire may not be exactly centered. I have my wheel spacers installed according to the maintenance manual and my wheel is about 3/8" offset to the right. I centered my fender on the tire instead of the frame.
I built the brackets from 1" x 1/8" angle iron, and cut off part of the bottom so it wouldn't over hang the cross member. All they are is a 3" section of angle with two holes drilled in it. I marked the center and aligned it with the center of the tire, and tacked it in place.


It occurred to me about this time that the bolt length might make removal and installation of the fender a pain, so I changed my plan a little and decided to weld nuts to the fender to allow removal of the bolts.......it's easier to slide into place like that!
Align the fender EXACTLY where you want it. Put one nut on the bolt, slide the bolt through the bracket, and put TWO nuts on the other side. Put that last nut on so that the threads of the bolt aren't showing through at all. Now adjust the bolt toward the fender till the nut closest to the fender makes contact with the fender. Next you'll need to tighten the nuts on either side of the bracket to keep the bolt firmly in place while you make final tweaks. Turn the nut closest to the fender till as much of it as possible contacts the fender, and tack weld it there.


CAUTION HERE!!!! The heater hose is probably on fire from welding nearby. Make sure it goes out!

continued.......
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
To fill the wedge shaped gap between the nut and fender, I then cut lock washers in half and wedged them in. They're barely visible in this next pic if you can see past my crappy welds:


Next I removed the fender and began welding around the nut and pieces of lock washer filling gaps and beginning to form a bit of a fillet all the way around.



That's about where I ran outta time for the night, but I did put the fender back on to make sure it was sturdy and straight.



By the way, I realize it looks a little goofy with those long bolts sticking out. In these pics the fender and wheel are all the way forward, but when they're moved back to where the chain is tight, there isn't much bolt sticking out at all. In the case that I'd need to run the wheel and fender all the way up like that I'd simply use shorter bolts.

Hopefully this will give you guys some ideas, and don't mind those welds....I'm just learning TIG and my dang MIG broke!
Johnny
 
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