Jockey Journal Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
626 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
so i'm getting ready to pull my clutch to try and figger if anything in there has anything to do with my trans not wanting to shift with the engine running.

i may wind up needing to replace stuff so i was hoping i could get a recommendation on a clutch kit.

i'm not in the neighborhood for a barnett or rivera, so a nice stock style (or stock style upgraded) clutch is what i'm after. i'm not a cheap skate, i just don't wanna spend the money on a conversion right now, nor do i really know what i'm looking at quality wise when i'm looking thru the catalogs.. i'll probably put a bearing retainer in there while i'm at it if there's not one already.

the particulars are as such... 78 fxs, 4 speed, belt drive, stock enclosed primary.

thanks for your input.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,036 Posts
I dont like to promote a blatant knock off but theres an inexpensive "pro clutch" style replacement available.

For me the only thing that cured the stock clutch shortcomings ( when running a belt ) is to replace the roller bearing cage w/ a sealed style bearing.

I've owned both the Rivera and now a BDL and both eliminated any worry about 4 speed clutch issues
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,485 Posts
Before pulling the trans, try a few checks. Look at the clutch rod end on the clutch side, if it is galled or chewed up, you have a bad throw out bearing, probably, or a over adjusted clutch. Or pull the kicker cover, or end cover if you don't have a kicker, and look at the oil, and the throwout bearing. If the oil is yellowish/white, it is contaminated with water. If it is empty, then you also have found your problem. Also, the clutch hub is prone to getting trashed up from the clutch debris that accumulates from normal use. It gums up the plates, the clutch notch lugs, and most people install new clutch plates, and pay no attention to the rods they run on. When they get wavy, the clutch plates don't want to seperate. Not to mention, the holes the rods go through, are usually a little to tight to allow free movement. The "clutch tamer", the metal one, is worth the money, to keep the plates from creeping you forward at the redlights. Running a wet primary, you have many different clutches to pick from. If you need them. If they are still thick, you can clean and scuff on a sheet of 60 grit, on a sheet of glass, and they are almost good as new. 4 speeds are pretty bullet proof inside the gearbox, and you can do more damage in there they you can imagine, if you are not used to opening them up. Plus, most shifting problems are in the clutch, the throwout bearing and rod or the cable/adjustment.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top