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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
ok so i bought this tank from a guy that had two noticeable dents. once i started sanding it down i found out it had a pretty huge dent on one side. i got it for like $50, so it wont be a huge lose if i fuck it up.


i guess my question is if i cut out the tunnel, knock the dents out some then cut the tunnel down, how hard with it be to weld back in with a 110v mig? my welding skills are not great but im not terrible. and would i need to use kreem or something to really seal it?
 

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You can weld it up with mig. You will need to bodywork it a good bit. You will also need to pressure test it really well and hit the pinholes when you can.

With Tig it would be easier as you can control the heat better than a Mig. Like I said, though, it can be done. Take your time and go for it. If nothing else, it'll be a relatively inexpensive learning experience.

Good luck.

C
 

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You might get it done but it will more than likely leak. If the pinholes are small enough you can use tank sealer to seal it up. The welds have to be completed fully penetrated. It's tough to do with a novice machine.
Agreed. I much prefer tig'ing this kind of stuff, but if you're patient, the mig will work. Just dont go blowing a bunch of holes in the thing ;)
 

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You'll have to do start and stop welds so you don't warp the shit out of it from heat. Start and stop + porosity in your welds will probably cause lots of pin hole leaks.

I moved a tunnel and filler on a wassell and when I pressure tested it I found a ton of leaks. I brazed the pin holes, but every one I brazed seemed to open up another one or two...obviously the metal was pretty shot. That tank went in the shit pile. The next tank I had with pin holes in - I soldered it.

If nothing else screwing up your tank will be good experience.

Personally I wouldn't want to rely on sealer to make my tank air tight, but then again people seem to think I have a stick up my ass when it comes to stuff like that.

You might get it done but it will more than likely leak. If the pinholes are small enough you can use tank sealer to seal it up. The welds have to be completed fully penetrated. It's tough to do with a novice machine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
i can do either gas or flux, which would be better?

also, would i be smarted to just tack it in place then take it to someone would could tig weld it?

thanks for all the responses so far, getting useful responses on internet forums seems to be a rare thing nowadays.
 

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Having just gone through this with a Wassell, I can tell you that a MIG will very likely burn the shit out of it, especially if you don't have a lot of experience.

Even with TIG I had to be very gentle with the amps and build some of that paper-thin metal back up, I had to use chill bars, all sorts of tricks. TIG is the tool for that job.
 

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If you like bikes and playing around, you should try & do it. Use gas with the mig, not the flux core. Practice on some other sheet metal.

If you want it it nice, leak free, & not warped, then tacking it & getting somebody to tig it is the best idea, but has no learning experience. Thats the better part I think, start doing stuff, and a 50 dollar tanks a good place to start.
 

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I think the best approach with MIG is short, small passes (3/4 or 1 inch welds), alternating sides and allowing some serious "cool down" periods. Do not rush it, drink a beer. And really tune your machine and yourself on some test pieces of the same thickness, give yourself a chance to succeed. Instead of a sealer, you can call a local radiator shop (if you don't braze), usually it won't cost much, unless you really fuck it up... Welding a tank can be one of the easiest things to do, if you really are good or great, but the hardest if you think you are better than you are. Good luck and get to it, fuck it it was only 50 bucks.
 

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i think forget about cutting it apart and just either have a shop use the spot-stud welder/puller thing im not sure what its called.... or just weld on some washers from the outside, heat up the area and pull the dents out with a hook. cut off the washers, add lead and be done with it. theres no need to have the metal perfect unless youre going to have a bare metal bike.



 

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i can do either gas or flux, which would be better?
Avoid the flux-core - if you do it yourself since you'll probably end up blowing through the metal. Make sure you're using the .023" wire.

If you go the tack together route and have someone else weld it - you may want to pressure test it before you cut it up. As Doc mentioned (as was my experience) the metal is thin and junky...you may find it's riddled with pin holes and not worth laying out cash for someone to weld.

The tank I replaced my Wassell with was a Daisho. Same style, but thicker metal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
well i want a frisco tank. i know it most cases people just say to buy one already done and itll be cheaper, but i like the idea of learning how to do things myself, thats half the fun to me.
 

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Use gas, and if you have the option (although most don't) run a mix with more argon like 93/8. That'll help keep you from blowing through the thin wassel metal. If you don't feel comfortable with it, or if you start blowing holes, tack it up and take it to someone with a TIG. There's a guy near me who TIG-brazes my tanks with a silicon-bronze filler. Amazing stuff, and always air tight.
 
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