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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anyone suggest a good way to insulate a taillight from vibration? My original one had three bushings with metal sleeves through them to keep vibration from transferring from the mount to the light and helped prevent blown bulbs.

I fabbed up a ne bracket for the new tail light I plan on using, but I can't use the original bushings because the mount is thicker than the stock one.

Any thoughts on what I should do? In fact, does it even need to be insulated from the vibration? The bike is a Kawasaki 750 - not much in the way of heavy vibration - with rear suspension - not much road jostling.

Thanks for the help,
Jay
 

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Those little rubber coated washers work OK for stuff like that if your mount is made in such a way that they won't be seen. Or make your own by plasti-dipping some washers. Just think of it like rubber mounting an engine and put them at all the connections to the fender (or where ever your putting it).

I have yet to run one but I hear the that LED replacement bulbs are pretty hearty when used on a bike. Between those two things I doubt you'll have any trouble on a bike that smooth.
 

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KnuckleBuster said:
Can anyone suggest a good way to insulate a taillight from vibration? My original one had three bushings with metal sleeves through them to keep vibration from transferring from the mount to the light and helped prevent blown bulbs.

I fabbed up a ne bracket for the new tail light I plan on using, but I can't use the original bushings because the mount is thicker than the stock one.

Any thoughts on what I should do? In fact, does it even need to be insulated from the vibration? The bike is a Kawasaki 750 - not much in the way of heavy vibration - with rear suspension - not much road jostling.

Thanks for the help,
Jay
This may sound strange but here's something that worked for me...
I made little gaskets out of skateboard grip tape and stuck the on every surface that mated to another surface ( so that the sandpapery surfaces were touching) and put everything back together. Seemed to do the trick and no more blown bulbs. maybe it soaked up some vibes?
 

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TNsportster said:
This may sound strange but here's something that worked for me...
I made little gaskets out of skateboard grip tape and stuck the on every surface that mated to another surface ( so that the sandpapery surfaces were touching) and put everything back together. Seemed to do the trick and no more blown bulbs. maybe it soaked up some vibes?
Or skateboard truck mounting pads, just cut them to the shapes you need. Reduce vibration rather well.
 

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Like ol scratch said, truck mounting pads work. If you don't have any around and/or wanna sve a little money, P.M. me. I've got access to small sheets of silicone that would work perfectly. Details can be discussed privately, but they cost VERY little. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I think I may have figured something out....

I was at the hardware store the other day and came across some faucet parts - little tapered rubber washers about 1/4" thick. They fit the bolts nicely and sit in the countersunk holes in the bracket really well. After tightening everything down, you only see maybe 1/16" of the washer, it's hard rubber, and seems like it may do the trick.

We'll see what happens once I get it on the road. I just fabbed up an aluminum license plate bracket, so I'm one step closer to the highway.

Later,
Jay
 
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