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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm in the planning stage on a new scoot, and I would like to set it up with a jockey shift. I am wondering if there is a clutch pedal design that could be set up in a traditional forward control that uses some sort of detent. I don't want to run floorboards. I just don't think the rocker clutch would look or work right with a traditional fwd control setup. I've never ridden a bike with a jockey shift and would like to have some sort of set up that would allow me to have the clutch disengaged while being able to put my foot down in an emergency. I've done numerous searches on this site and the internet and can't seam to find anything. Surely I'm not the first one that has looked into this.
 

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If it's not stock, you have to build it yourself. Or........... wait around on someone else to make it and pay out your ass for it.

Maybe jockey shift isn't for everyone ?

Sixball
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
I did find a patent that this guy made. It is a ratchet and pawl design. Has anyone made or could make this or something similar?

http://www.freepatentsonline.com/6945376.html

I'm not a machinist, nor do I have access to a welder. So it would be nearly impossible for me to try to construct something like this.
 

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Surely I'm not the first one that has looked into this.
Probably not.

But I will tell you this...it's unnecessary. If you're the least bit skilled in riding, you'll probably stall your bike once with a properly set up jockey shift while learning, then never look back.

Guys like to make it sound like you need to be some big hairy fucking Viking to ride jockey, call it "suicide" clutch and all that shit, but it's easy, it's fun, and will feel natural in a very short time.
 

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I think the good Doctor Benway is correct, but if you were bent on making something.... the design you referenced looks like overkill to me.

Heck... just off the top of my head I think it would be easier to adapt one of those hydraulic clutch systems to a brake pedal.

http://timscbx.com/home page web pics/hydraulic clutch 003.jpg

And if you WANT to be able to put your feet down with the clutch disengaged, put some kind of electronic check valve in it. A button on your handlebar would lock the fluid in the cylinder.

It might be a blast to rev the bike and hit the electric release switch and burn rubber all the way down the street.

Too far out?
 

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Y'see now...

Part of the appeal of the jockey shift (aside from fun factor) is to simplify the bike.
You bolt a handle to your trans.
You run a rod or a dog chain from your clutch arm to your pedal.
Ride, rinse, repeat.

You've eliminated a cable, and you now have nothing on your right side handlebar. Your shift handle sure isn't going to break, neither is your clutch rod under normal use.

Once you start adding shit back on (cables, janky crossover jackshaft pillow block foolishness, whatever) you're going backwards from the original philosophy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Have you considered trying to contact Robert M. Hunter?
No! I just stumbled onto this today!

Thanks fellas, maybe it would be overkill. I just get to thinking that I would hate to dump a bunch of time and money into a project and jump into cross traffic at a stop light on my first attempted jockey ride.
 

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All you need is a little pawl that is spring loaded in the up or off position. A cable connected to the pawl on one end and a little trigger on the bars, like a Brit compression release. Shove in the clutch an pull the trigger, The pawl drops into a notch on the pedal and will stay there until you push on the pedal, at which time the spring will lift the pawl out of the notch and yer ready to go.
BTW, I'm 64 and have ridden many miles on jockey shift bikes. Never had one with a rocker pedal. Never wished I had some sort of gizmo to keep the clutch released. Just build it and ride it. It's fairly intuitive and you'll be a jockey pro in no time
 

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The non mechanical fix, is to shift into neutral, while coasting to a stop. Put both feet down. Green light, left foot up to clutch pedal, shift into gear, and give it hell. No wrenches needed. No welder needed. No chemical warfare certificate needed. Just neutral.
 

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Raynoslo- "jump into cross traffic at a stop light on my first attempted jockey ride."

Umm...common sense would dictate you not ride in sketchy situations until you know your bike. When I first went jockey I hit up the nearest business park and got the hang of it. It's not difficult once you get the feel of your clutch. Keep it simple and you'll be fine.
 

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I would hate to....jump into cross traffic at a stop light on my first attempted jockey ride.
You're much more likely just to stall the motor. I'm with Benway on this one, jockey shifting is simple, easy, and doesn't take long to get used to, (which you should probably be doing in a low traffic area for a little bit.)

Ever know a woman who "really wants to ride" and is physically able, but has no self confidence so she ends up with a trike, or worse yet, training wheels? Don't be her. You don't need a crutch.
 

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Boss hosses used to have a conventional clutch lever, and it had a little arm with a tooth that would drop down after pulling in the lever. They did it because the clutch was king kong stiff. When the light changed, you'd pull the lever and then raise the arm with your foot, and off you'd go.

Personally, I , like the N-1 shift drum from Baker. If you have a 4 speed (likely), then just deepen the notch for neutral. It's not too hard to get used to, especially if it's your only bike. I get screwed up because my FXRT hot-rod has 1up 4down, my early XLs have right side shift and my other bikes have conventional left side shifters. THEN, my chopper is OG suicide clutch/jockey shift. Swapping rides always takes a couple of mistakes to acclimate!
 
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