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Can anyone lend some insight on any issues that might arise from having a oxy actylene cutting setup in a home garage?

surprised not to see anything here on the topic and did some reading online, but wanted some human feedback to whether it's a bad idea to have this stuff near living space (attached garage)

guess I'm a bit tenative because I watched a few youtube videos and saw some douchetards mishandling the gases -- which I guess is not necessarily a bad thing because it opened my eyes to how dangerous it can actually be.

Who uses it & what precautions do you take to keep it safe?
 

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Just know proper setup and shutdown procedure. Always keep the Acetylene tank vertical. Chain them to something so that they can't be knocked over.

I have always just used rental tanks from the local gas place (something like $12/month to have both tanks) and then they just drop off full ones when you need.
 

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have kept all kinds of gasses.. think about how many thousands of older folks who have oxygen tanks laying around..

you have a car in your garage with 20-30 gal. of unleaded.

propane tank on your grill next to your house on a deck.

ect ect.

you are looking to far into it. if its a small tank setup use a 5 gal bucket to hold everything. if its large tanks get a cart or chain them to the studs in your garage so they dont accidently get knocked over.

about it.. just keep a fire extinguisher close by incase something does get ignited when using it.
 

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The bottles themselves are not a problem, but using them can be... You will need to practice good fire safety habits when cutting/welding. Remember to turn the bottles off when you leave the area...

Common sense stuff first, like proper housekeeping, removing solvents & fuels from the area, fire extinguisher handy, fire blankets to prevent sparks from flying uder the drywall, good ventilation, etc.

Be aware that when you're using a torch you're not watching where the slag or sparks are going; you and/or your garage could be on fire when you look up... Industrial safety rules require a sparkwatch while cutting/welding and for min. 15 minutes afterwards.

I lined my welding bay walls with 11g aluminum as an added safety measure.

 

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First thing is buy balloons and........ Next have a fire going in the fireplace. Then start a scary story and throw said balloons into fire place.
Youll be a big hit with the neighbor kids. Works on camping trips also.
 

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Keep your bottles chained to your cart. Always turn the valves on your bottles off when not in use. Do your burning (cutting) outside if possible. Yes your neighbors will freak, but it is better than a spark igniting something in the garage. Lastly, see what your home insurance agent says if there ever was a claim. Some companies have stipulations chemicals( autobody supplies), compressed gases, welding rigs, etc.
 

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Keep your tanks capped when not in use. And secured/fastened. One step further, "I separate my tanks from either side of the garage."
 

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pretty much covered.

don't knock em over and break reg's off or they'll take walls, roofs out and everything in between.

try to have someone on 'fire watch'.

and don't have plastic lighters around, in yer pocket, whatever . get a bit of splatter, 'red hot rupert' melt through the side and you have an instant engulfing fireball.

end of public information message.
 

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I've used torches for years at work and basically common sense and just being alert is the main key. To add to the plastic lighter bit, I saw a guy light a torch with a Bic lighter a few years back and it blew up in his hand. After that I never used anything but a striker to light it.
 

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it's a good idea to have the garage door open when you are using the bottles. If your regulator starts leaking, and you are in a closed enviroment, it could potentially turn your garage in to a nuclear bomb. Not to mention breathing in all the shit that burns off whatever you happen to be torching(like grease, lubricants, melting rubber).
 

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here`s a good one~ unscrew the pressure valve on the regs when shutting them down,,,[i know, no one does] but its REALLY hard on the diaphragms in the regs to crack that fresh 2200 lb oxy bottle onto a live regulator! i started doing this some years ago and my regs work great for SOOOO much longer! and only turn the main valve on just enough to see pressure on the high side, 1/2 to 3/4 turns is all it generally takes, makes shutting them down in a hurry lots easier!
 

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No mention of the 1/7 rule yet?
I have an O/A rig, but I would consider just getting a propane setup for cutting. It seems cheaper, easier and probably slightly safer.
 

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Can anyone lend some insight on any issues that might arise from having a oxy actylene cutting setup in a home garage?
I ran out of acetylene on a Sunday when the welding supply was closed. Make sure you've got enough gas to get through the weekend. Other issues? None really if you just follow the applicable safety precautions.

Bob
 

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Surprised no one has mentioned keeping oil and greases away from the oxygen which if become in contact can and will spontaneously ignite.Make sure you have flashback arrestors installed
 

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Having O/A tanks, and using them, is mainly a common sense thing. Don't try braizing up full gas tanks, don't try to cut your brake lines, and don't use them to open dynamite. So now for the real stuff. I keep mine in my shop, next to my house. I always keep the valves tightly closed, and I always evacuate the remaining gas from the lines after shutting down. Even though mine are in a rolling rig, I keep the safty rigs on top, just in case I trip moving them around, to keep the valves from being broken off. The safty caps(not the regular covers) are made for being in a moving vehicle, but they work great in a shop too. Nothing is better than knowledge, when it comes to being safe. If you don't feel safe, with them in your garage, then put them in another place, away from your house. Mainly, they are only dangerous, if you do stupid stuff. If your dryer is in the garage, or a home heater unit, make sure you keep them as far away as possible. Maybe start with a miniature set, that you can store in a safe place, without having to build a seperate place. I don't know the stats, but I have seen more people hit by lightning, than exploded by O/A tanks. Not to mention, most of the accidents I have seen, were by trained pros, not paying attention to safty. The alternative, is a hack saw and a big soldering iron.
 

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MeanMike has a good point but when you ask, don't tell them you already have it, just say that you're thinking about getting it. also keep the tanks in a well ventilated area just in case you don't shut the tank off all the way or if you've got a leaky valve, when i was in high skool we had a tank room and the oxy/actylene was then sent through pipes to all the tech rooms with a torch set up, that way if theres a problem it's all contained in this one room off the back of the skool
 
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