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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
....as I getting my little motorcycle machine shop thing going, I'm looking around at smaller metal lathes. Found a Unimat Model SL 1000, but can't find out any info on how big these were. Anybody know. Sneaking suspicion its too small for my use.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yep, that does. And as I thought, it is too small.

Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks. I'll keep an eye out.

Basically what I want to be able to do is make specialty fasteners (If anybody needs whitworth, I'll be doing those), make some jigs to do valves and hone cylinders, and any other bike parts I might need to widdle . Mostly doing it for myself or for any "friends" that need something cheaper. So its doesn't need to be a big jobber. I just lost out on an Atlas 610 that would have been perfect.

Got a good X-y-z drill press table top, so I can do light milling on my press as well. So propriety isn't utmost, as long as it works good.
 

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ol_scratch said:
make some jigs to do valves and hone cylinders, and any other bike parts I might need to widdle
I don't know your abilities with the lathe, so please pardon me if this is something you already know:

You're gonna need a mightly accurate lathe to do cylinders with, particularly if you plan to bore them and not just hone them. If you do make a jig to hold Sunnen style hones (with the center-pin to adjust diam. (LB style)), you'll probaly need to let the cylinder fixture float on the carriage to account for any slight eccentricity/play in the head/chuck.

Valves seem like they'd be even tougher to do in a lathe unless you're planning on mounting a tool post grinder.

If you do get setup to do valve grinding and cylinder honing, you might want to setup some type or recirc system in the tray under the lathe.

Mind you, I am no expert machinist, I have just found over the last few years that the level of accuracy required for some motor-building jobs is beyond the capability of many home shop machines. Of course, great skill and patience in the operator can probably overcome this to some extent. But, it's probably not be very cost-effective to do so.

No matter what, you'll have fun with a lathe in your shop.

jason
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
No problem, I appreciate positive feedback. Not offended at all. Fortunately I've been privy to working on more "Ghetto" (for lack of better term) machinery, and realize the eccentricities in the venture. Done the work. Plus been around gunsmithing. After I get the lathe, I'm gonna work on a good solid jig set-up. I might do things unorthodox, but I make sure there'll be done right before doing anything. Probably why it takes me so much longer to do something. The honing and valving is the last in line of the other things I'd like to be able to take care of. Reason I want a smaller unit, is size is an issue. Shop in the house is only 16 x 30.

Its not a business venture at all, but I figure having a good home shop will be beneficial in keeping the herd on the road. And I might be able to help some people out who need it along the way.
 

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I have an old southbend model A 1929 it has a 6 in swing and a long (48 inch) bed. Uses flat belts and has three speeds, mostly I use the center pulley. Has worked for me for the last 20 years and made everything from bolts to surfacing valves ( carbide tools help). They should go about $600 to $800 and as long as you don't try to take more than .025 depth on mild steel will work well for what you need. Since they are no good for production they are available. The company I work for gets flyers for used equipment all the time last week I got one from a company by you called HGR near Allentown had a southbend listed last week a slightly larger unit than mine for $850. I'm sorry I threw out the flyer but I know they are listed in Liehi Valley (sp) you might want to check them out. If I get another copy I'll send to you.
 

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oldspeed said:
I have an old southbend model A 1929 it has a 6 in swing and a long (48 inch) bed. Uses flat belts and has three speeds, mostly I use the center pulley. Has worked for me for the last 20 years and made everything from bolts to surfacing valves ( carbide tools help). They should go about $600 to $800 and as long as you don't try to take more than .025 depth on mild steel will work well for what you need. Since they are no good for production they are available. The company I work for gets flyers for used equipment all the time last week I got one from a company by you called HGR near Allentown had a southbend listed last week a slightly larger unit than mine for $850. I'm sorry I threw out the flyer but I know they are listed in Liehi Valley (sp) you might want to check them out. If I get another copy I'll send to you.
Found the web site it is: www.hgrindustrialsurplus.com
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks.
 

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Scratch,
An Atlas would probably be a little lite for what you want to do. I use a Logan 200, 10 inch with change gears, lots of parts still available. You'd need something with a quick change gearbox but cutting Whitworth threads will probably be a problem. Look for a Southbend or Logan 10 or 11 inch, lots of them out there. For valves, I'd search the oldest car dealers in your area and ask if they have any old valve equipment that they would like to part with. Most of the old timers had a Black and Decker valve grinder set that's probably been collecting dust for 40 years. I picked up an old Kwik-Way valve grinder for 25 bucks that probably got used a bunch on Model T's, it still works great.

ol_scratch said:
Thanks. I'll keep an eye out.

Basically what I want to be able to do is make specialty fasteners (If anybody needs whitworth, I'll be doing those), make some jigs to do valves and hone cylinders, and any other bike parts I might need to widdle . Mostly doing it for myself or for any "friends" that need something cheaper. So its doesn't need to be a big jobber. I just lost out on an Atlas 610 that would have been perfect.

Got a good X-y-z drill press table top, so I can do light milling on my press as well. So propriety isn't utmost, as long as it works good.
 

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ol_scratch said:
Basically what I want to be able to do is make specialty fasteners (If anybody needs whitworth, I'll be doing those), make some jigs to do valves and hone cylinders, and any other bike parts I might need to widdle.
Now i didnt read all the other replies so this might have already been said. DO NOT try to hone cylinders in a lathe. Im no expert but i am what youd call an "intermediate - advanced machinist" you would be better of (and be within tolerances) with an internal surface grinder. Or honing attachment in a machine ohter then a lthe where the work piece is not moving. Again ive never tried to do any cylinders with a lathe but on anything where precision is required the most important aspect is RIGIDITY. Something that a lathe doesnt have compared other machines.

:confused: ive said to much.. ill stop now
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
yard man said:
Now i didnt read all the other replies so this might have already been said. DO NOT try to hone cylinders in a lathe. Im no expert but i am what youd call an "intermediate - advanced machinist" you would be better of (and be within tolerances) with an internal surface grinder. Or honing attachment in a machine ohter then a lthe where the work piece is not moving. Again ive never tried to do any cylinders with a lathe but on anything where precision is required the most important aspect is RIGIDITY. Something that a lathe doesnt have compared other machines.

:confused: ive said to much.. ill stop now
I used to work as a cycle/snowmobile mechanic in high school, and cylinders were done on a lathe. The cylinders mounted in a rigid jig, and a honing attached via chuck. It worked pretty well. Honestly I'd prefer using a vertical set-up like a milling machine with lockdowns, but that is not an option under these circumstances. I'm trying to make best of the situation.

Thanks for your concerns everyone. Its nice to know people are actually willing to share constructive criticisms, on not so orthodox ideas.
 
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