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starting a new job and moving all of your projects to a new shop ( including 5 vehicles and a trailer that won't carry any of them ) and 8 toolboxes has consumed all of my time for the past few months...

have started working in the new shop (1700 sq ft) but think i am working on other peoples stuff to pay for the space... i hope the work keeps coming but fear i will continue to not make progress on my own projects...

on the bright side other people are paying for me to store them all in one place and when i do get time they dont have to be moved out from under something and packed back up when i am finished...

sorry for the rant, hope to finish the triumph soon...
 

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I know the feeling, we are doing the same thing moving into much bigger shop at a time when there is no confidence in the economy.
good luck to you, I hope it all works out.
 

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Not moving, but adding on to my existing shop, in my back yard. I too, take in outside work, and have been for a few years now. Never any time to work on my own stuff as well. But working on old iron is my passion, and when I get a chance, I too, drag out one of my projects to see if I can get anything done. Even with the economy so bad, the bikers who love to ride, still need their bikes fixed, so it is all working out good in the end. The leap of faith is only good, if you have passion for what you do.
 

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F8TL, Embrace the fact that you are doing something you love. You are building for other people and making a living. Time will free up as you get comfy. I know this feeling well, I quit a decent paying day job 4 years ago to do go out on my own. I worked from my 600 sq. ft. home shop and was doing ok. I still made time in the evenings to do some work for myself. I kept my own projects in the neighbors garage and could still make headway a little bit.

I needed to go legal. Last spring I bought out a local fab shop that I learned this crap in from my buddy that taught it to me. I had to keep working on my customers projects while cleaning up the new place and moving my tools in as well. Then there was extra stuff to sell and things to repair. Shelves to make. Decorate a bit. Get signs made and hung. New shop truck to repair and a trailer to do a lot of work on. I moved a truck load of boxes every time I went to the new place. We did an hour or 2 every day of "shop work" after we would do 6+ hours of customer work. He was a hoarder and was in poor health so the place was a real mess. Piles of boxes everywhere with all kinds of crap in them that belonged elsewhere. No real organization. Nuts and bolts in little cardboard boxes and baby food jars all over and jumbled up. It took me 18 months to get it where it is now. Actually about 5 months longer as I started the clean up before we actually signed a deal. Probably 400 man hours of labor to get where it is. All the hardware still is not all put away but it's tolerable.

I am now at the point where I am getting my financials in a condition where I can start to set aside a few hours to maybe get back to work on something for myself. Hell, It took me 3 weeks to get to putting a new clutch cable on my only bike. I haven't even had much time to ride. I got 1 great run and 3 decent day rides in so far this year. That is 2x the riding I did last season so it's getting better.

Make some money, build your reputation, be glad you have work. Concentrate on learning how the business works and taking care of the bills and when some smoke clears you'll start to see that all that hard work is paying off and you'll be able to have time and money for yourself again.

Good luck man.
 

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Similar story here. . .

Have moved my workshop three times in the last five years. I was in the Brooklyn shop for eight years. You'd be amazed at how much shit you can pack in to how many corners when you've been somewhere for that long.

The move before last actually got me back to basics. One well-built bench, stuff arranged on banquet tables along the far wall and bikes in the back. No fancy workstations like I'd built up in the other places. Tried a new style of organizing too. . . . Work out of boxes for a couple months, leave the tools and parts where you use them the most. At one point you realize that you have unconsciously turned chaos into something that works. Build your stations and storage at that point.

Got tired of being at the mercy of landlords and always worrying about putting too much work and $ into someone else's joint and bought a building in the ghetto last summer. I had been saving for six or seven years to get down-payment money. Two blocks from Kensington & Allegheny for those that know know Philly. Notorious area for the last forty years.

My buddies bought a building and a house on that block too. Now it's a functional and safe oasis in an otherwise shitty area. Our neighbors love us and what we've done. Had a huge block party this spring and the whole block was shut down. Neighbors cooked us food (chicken, rice and beans as good as any I've had in Brooklyn) and even made up some homemade liquor (pitu?) Another neighbor with a busted shitpile corner lot full of garbage told us we could have it for use if we cleaned it up. It's now a garden. A friend who is an artist came in and painted all walls with cool graphics.

Getting time down at the shop has been tough with a new son this year and having a full-time day job.

But, as was already mentioned, you've gotta look at this as building something that'll last and please you in the long haul. Learning to be patient has been (and continues to be) extremely difficult for me. But, I'm starting to see the light.

Tiny steps in the right direction, taken over weeks and months and years, will take you where you always wanted to be.

Jason

p.s. - sorry for the diatribe. hyper fingers and brain today for some reason
 

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Went from "lot lizard" {auto P&B on-the-lot} to working the same cars in a barn. Barn was converted to a home, so I had to go...found a small-time P&B shop and rented 1/2 of it.

Added another dealership to the client list.

End result, working 7 day weeks and my Triumph sits on the stand collecting bondo dust...

Gonna take time to ride the dirtbike this weekend! Yea! a day off!
 
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