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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

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I made a dual carb manifold for my wifes 1965 TR6RS 650 and was looking a dual plugging it too. Theirs not enough room to place the second plug opposite the stock location. I looked at locating in the center like that one but it looked like trouble in the long run. Thats ok for a race engine that's run a short time and then torn but would crack at the seats over time. I ran a front head with a crack between the plug hole and exhaust seat on an old HD Pan Head on time and the seat got loose, busted the valve and wound up breaking the rod and blowing most or the front cylinder off. Here's the best pic of the manifold with twin Mukinis.
 

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We run a Westlake 8 Valve set up at the Antique Nationals every year, or at least the last few. Not next year, long story of ignorance. . .

The westlake on a stock 650 motor gives it lots more RPMs and bumps it to about 695ccs. Faster spinup and more singshot effect at the drag Strip. Seems to me, in my limited experience with the thing, that the combination of the heavier Triumph flywwheel and the added RPMs make for less fall between gears and more top end by the time you get to the end of the road. Gotta have the dual carbs though.

But I have also discovered that sprokets are way more important that RPM's for light duty dragging. For bracket racing, which a lot of "drag Racing" is these days, is all about dialing in a time and getting close to it. For that it is all about sprokets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
fouraceswes said:
We run a Westlake 8 Valve set up at the Antique Nationals every year, or at least the last few. Not next year, long story of ignorance. . .

The westlake on a stock 650 motor gives it lots more RPMs and bumps it to about 695ccs. Faster spinup and more singshot effect at the drag Strip. Seems to me, in my limited experience with the thing, that the combination of the heavier Triumph flywwheel and the added RPMs make for less fall between gears and more top end by the time you get to the end of the road. Gotta have the dual carbs though.

But I have also discovered that sprokets are way more important that RPM's for light duty dragging. For bracket racing, which a lot of "drag Racing" is these days, is all about dialing in a time and getting close to it. For that it is all about sprokets.
Wes is the ruler as usual! How's it goin' man? I figured you would know something about those heads. Don't worry, I won't be sending my motor in to you for another rebuild... at least not until I kill this one! HAA! Going to get 'er started this weekend. I'll keep you posted! :)
 

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I learned all about sprockets the hard way too. I used a Yamaha Sega rear wheel on my wifes Triumph Chopper (brake on the right/sprocket on the left) and it was geared kinda high. On this side of the mountains we're fairly flat and things seemed ok, it allowed her to keep up with my 56 pan/shovel without reving too high. Then we got onto the mountains! Not enough torque to pull the gears. We hit a good grade and see would dissapear in the mirrors, drop back and she's in 2nd going 45, what tha F#*k!! Back to the drawing board. Sprocket Specialties to the rescue. Picked a number half way between the Triumph and Yamaha sprocket, put it on and lifes been fine ever since.
 
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