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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm putting together a Panhead from cobbled parts, and here I have my rear wheel. I haven't been able to find one that looks just like it, so I'm not sure what axle spacer I will need to get the brake backing plate the correct distance from the drum, and also correct distance from the axle plate (unknown hardtail frame).

Ive included pics of the hub/brakes. If I had a positive ID on them, I'd know which year axle spacer to get.

Also- when you guys build rear wheel setups on a custom chopper, do you have these spacers custom made to line up the sprockets? Seems like a complicated part to have manufactured.




 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Here are some of the varieties I've found. At $50 a piece, I can't afford to buy em all and resell what I don't need. I also can't find measurements for any of them, so measuring my setup doesn't help me unless I get it custom made (seems unnecessary).



 

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No Mystery, that is a Sportster hub with a British brake bolted to it. No H-D spacer will work. If you are going to run it you will need to fab all the parts to do so!
Robbie
 

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No Mystery, that is a Sportster hub with a British brake bolted to it. No H-D spacer will work. If you are going to run it you will need to fab all the parts to do so!
Robbie
I second that one It is a sporty hub
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Definitely explains why an image search for big twin drums turned up nothing similar.

Now I'm thinking I should run one spacer inside the backing plate/drum to get the right gap there, and another outside the backing plate to the axle plate. Varying the size of the exterior spacer would allow me to get the sprocket right where I need it in relation to the trans. Anything wrong with using two separate spacers to get it all rigged?
 

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You also need to be aware of some other issues. The sprocket is much smaller than a BT type so you will have to adjust gearing to work , and the brake is much smaller than a BT type so you need to take that into consideration as well! And once you get the chainline right you may need to offset the wheel lacing to get it to be centered in the frame as the braks drum is narrower than BT and will set the whole wheel off to the left!
Robbie
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yeah, fuck that mess. What exactly is "BT type"? Am I gonna be able to use the sportster wheel and just source a new brake? I'm not running a front brake (at least initially), so it's gotta be adequate in the back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Big twin. So can I mount a BT sprocket/brake on a sportster hub, or am I starting from scratch?
 

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Like the saying goes, a man with enough money can do anything.

But, from the looks of the frame, it is setup for a mechanical brake. The simplest thing would be to round up all those parts including a star hub wheel or just the star hub itself. Get someone who knows what they are doing to check the bearings and rebuild if necessary.

That sportster hub won't work with a BT mechanical brake drum.

Trials and tribulations, trials and tribulations....
 

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You would be better off starting from scratch.

Your easiest option is to sell the Triumph brakes, sell the Sportster wheel, and buy a star hub wheel and a mechanical brake setup. It looks like you have a cross shaft tube. Those will all be HD or replica parts and they should bolt up without having to machine or weld anything. The eBay listing you posted would be a good start. You'll also need the pedal, cross shaft and linkage.

A Hydraulic drum setup will also bolt into the axle plates, but you'd need to add a tab for the brake anchor. There are several threads on here about juice drum brakes, what fits what, etc. A disc brake using a dual flange shovel type hub isn't a big deal either. You'd need adapters to make the 3/4" axle fit your axle plates. Fab Kevin makes some. And an anchor tab welded on. I've seen guys use a 3 piece clamp for an anchor tab, but I wouldn't.

Any of those is gonna be considerably easier than trying to adapt a Sportster brake to your Big Twin frame. I'm not saying it can't be done, but why? Even though you've got half the parts already, the Sporty drum brake is pretty anemic on a Sporty, and the extra weight of the BT sure wouldn't improve things.
 

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personally I like the idea of running a drum like you have, & have been thinking of doing that very thing. seriously....

with big twins & sporty drums your tied to pretty much a 51 tooth, I know at one time you could get a sprocket with 1 or 2 teeth less, but I have not been able to find one.

I am planning to run a front drum brake, & want to run a british rear for the smaller sprocket, I like 46 to 48 tooth rear sprockets, & on a light weight bike, you wont have problems with accelerating if you keep bike light, I have done that with disc brakes, but now I want to do it with drum, & my frame also happenes to have a cross over shaft.

I like gas mileage, and planning for dual fuel tanks, & wanting ability to ride 300+ miles between filups.

as for what was said already, sportster rear brakes definately were not the greatest, however, I dont know which bike would be heavier, a stock sportster, or a stripped down big twin, I have no experience with british bikes, for how the brakes were, but figured I would try, to at least be different, plus to get a taller gear.

also, fabricating parts is what this life is about, & not just being bolt on.....

have fun & chop away.

Randy
 
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