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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There was a thread a little while back that talked about knurling tools. Seems like a few folks here use them. Can anyone recomend a brand or type of tool for making diamond patterns on round stock? I am not sure where to look to find something like this. Thanks.
 

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They sell em with one roller or two. The single ones suck for diamond patterns. I'm a machinist and I've done tons of knurling. There's kind of an art to it to get the pattern to look nice. You need the pressure on the rollers (top and bottom) to be dead even or the pattern will be out of whack. You need a shitload of pressure too so you need a rigid setup. In almost every case you'll need the work supported by a tailstock or steady rest or you'll just push it out of the chuck. Angling the wheels in the direction you're rolling helps. Go slow with the speed and feed. Engage the clutch and turn the tool into the work as it's feeding. If you stop to check it don't disengage the feed. This is probably the only time you'd ever do this on a manual lathe. If you need more pressure just keep turning the handwheel in slowly. Once you start don't pull the tool away cause it's very tough to get the rollers to mach if you try and make another pass. Use a ton of oil. Cutting oil works great but motor oil will work just fine. Of course this is all for making the knurl look nice. If you just want to rough up a piece of metal just crank er in and go.
Maybe I should post this in the tech area.

http://www1.mscdirect.com/cgi/nnsrhm
MSC has about everything you'll need.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Surly said:
They sell em with one roller or two. The single ones suck for diamond patterns. I'm a machinist and I've done tons of knurling. There's kind of an art to it to get the pattern to look nice. You need the pressure on the rollers (top and bottom) to be dead even or the pattern will be out of whack. You need a shitload of pressure too so you need a rigid setup. In almost every case you'll need the work supported by a tailstock or steady rest or you'll just push it out of the chuck. Angling the wheels in the direction you're rolling helps. Go slow with the speed and feed. Engage the clutch and turn the tool into the work as it's feeding. If you stop to check it don't disengage the feed. This is probably the only time you'd ever do this on a manual lathe. If you need more pressure just keep turning the handwheel in slowly. Once you start don't pull the tool away cause it's very tough to get the rollers to mach if you try and make another pass. Use a ton of oil. Cutting oil works great but motor oil will work just fine. Of course this is all for making the knurl look nice. If you just want to rough up a piece of metal just crank er in and go.
Maybe I should post this in the tech area.

http://www1.mscdirect.com/cgi/nnsrhm
MSC has about everything you'll need.
Thanks for the info. What do you mean by "rigid setup"? I don't know dick about machining...I just have access to a lathe that I've been messing around with a lot lately. Would like to try and make some knurled pegs/grips at some point.
 

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hogtownhd said:
Thanks for the info. What do you mean by "rigid setup"? I don't know dick about machining...I just have access to a lathe that I've been messing around with a lot lately. Would like to try and make some knurled pegs/grips at some point.
Rigid means make sure everything is nice and tight.

I use the scissor type knurl that I got from enco, http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PMAKA=505-4515&PMPXNO=951899&PARTPG=INLMK3

It works great and keeps from putting so much pressure on the crosslide and the tool, also its a good type to use if the lathe you are using is belt driven. I run the lathe in back gear (very slow, nothing is stopping it..) and I feed it fast (for the most part, just the opposite of what most peaple are taught). In aluminum and brass I dont use any kind of coolant or oil.

Heres a pic of 1 of the grips I do with it.
 

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Dan said:
I love the looks of the knurled grips, how are they comfort / practical wise??
If you ride with gloves they ait bad.. lol.

If your risers are mounted in rubber and you dont currently get bunch feedback through the bars, they arent bad. With the knurl your hand wont slip off. Biggest complaint I have about knurled grips is my hands are rarely clean so the knurl gets packed with grime. doesnt take a lot to get out, but gets old.. I use a can of carb cleaner and a nylon brush (like a tooth brush).
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Mute said:
Rigid means make sure everything is nice and tight.

I use the scissor type knurl that I got from enco, http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PMAKA=505-4515&PMPXNO=951899&PARTPG=INLMK3

It works great and keeps from putting so much pressure on the crosslide and the tool, also its a good type to use if the lathe you are using is belt driven. I run the lathe in back gear (very slow, nothing is stopping it..) and I feed it fast (for the most part, just the opposite of what most peaple are taught). In aluminum and brass I dont use any kind of coolant or oil.

Heres a pic of 1 of the grips I do with it.
With that tool, can you interchange knurl wheels to do different patterns? Also, where do you place the wheels on your work piece, top and bottom, or both on one side? (like I said before, I really don't know dick about this stuff) Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
hogtownhd said:
With that tool, can you interchange knurl wheels to do different patterns? Also, where do you place the wheels on your work piece, top and bottom, or both on one side? (like I said before, I really don't know dick about this stuff) Thanks.
Those are grips are really friggin' nice, by the way.
 

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hogtownhd said:
Those are grips are really friggin' nice, by the way.
Thanks.

1 wheel goes on top and 1 on bottom of the part. You adjust it by turning the nut. The wheels are interchangable. I use diamond, reverse diamond and staight knurls.
 

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Yep, what they said.

If you dont know dick about runnin a lathe might I reccomend "how to run a lathe" by the South Bend Lathe company. They are being reprinted by Lindsay books and the books are cheap. Good starting point. Oh, and roll up your sleeves past the elbow. If something gets caught in a lathe the fucker will eat you, no shit.

http://www.lindsaybks.com/bks/lathebk/index.html
 
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