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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
but somebodys gotta do it. Since i had a LOT of extra time on my hands trying to locate and obtain a seal kit for this engine, i figgered i would go ahead and take the plunge. Still no seal kit yet, but supposedly on the way from the great white north. I am not sure i would want to do another case polish again anytime soon. I still have a lot of touchups to do, but overall i think it turned out alright.
 

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Nice. You gotta be a glutton for punishment to do a second set of cases. I did that ONCE.
Randy D said:
but somebodys gotta do it. Since i had a LOT of extra time on my hands trying to locate and obtain a seal kit for this engine, i figgered i would go ahead and take the plunge. Still no seal kit yet, but supposedly on the way from the great white north. I am not sure i would want to do another case polish again anytime soon. I still have a lot of touchups to do, but overall i think it turned out alright.
 

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Allright...
So i've seen some posts regarding polishing and it sounds like a real nightmare/time consuming type of thing. I've never done any myself and was curious to know what goes into it and why its such a pain in the ass???

I usually just strip, primer and paint my shit.
Not enough class for the polish i guess...hahaha
 

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That looks great!
I was looking at my unit trump motor last night..and thats exactly what i was contemplating..
Lot's of work but in the end it really looks wild..
 

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after polishing a few cases myself i've desided for the time, mess, and effort envolved its better to just take it to a polisher and be done with it. That is unless you have way too much time on your hands inbetween unemployment checks and like to make a mess your girlfriend will leave you for :D
TP Cycles said:
Polishing is a major headache and a lot of work. Derek at Distinctive took this pan from raw to what you see here for about $50. Weigh the time and cost.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Well..... right or wrong, i just used what i had in the garage. the really rough stuff i used a flap disc on an angle grinder (very carefully). Then came the 'cookie duster' treatment. I used the coarse brown ones (and lots of em) and tried to keep it moving to not let it dig into one area too much. After i got things looking pretty smooth, i used 100 grit sandpaper to start "block sanding". Once everything got an even look to it, i went with 400 wet/dry paper and WD40 (seemed to cut a little better than dry). Then went to the polishing wheel. I think IF i do another, i would go another step with maybe 6 or 800 paper just to make the buffing time a little quicker. To say this is a messy job is a gross understatement. This kinda make me wonder what a professional shop woulda charged.....Man, but to tell ya'll the truth, i really dig the way it came out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
heh heh heh.... Teabaggin' is for the southern indiana boys. Take those side covers off the trump and we will see if we can make em shine a little mo

TRIUMPH TERROR said:
I think this calls for a T bag party!!!!!!:eek: In shelby Co.

Shit man still dont compare to my metal flake frame......:D

I guess the tables have turned now I gots to keep up with the Jones....:p

Shoe
 

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I worked on my primary cover one night for a couple hours because I had nothing better to do. I didn't quite even get to the bottom of the pits from the cast and I was already covered from head to toe with crap. I did that by hand too! Didn't have any power stuff to work with at the time. Going to buy an expander wheel that runs the replacable belts soon. Maybe two and a new grinder. My buddy has two of those 8" Harbor Freight specials with the long right side and they work awesome for the money. I think they're on sale for $69 or something right now.

Randy D.... what did you use to get into the tight spots?
 

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Man...that looks great.

I really REALLY want to do that to mine....whenever it comes apart.
(It doesn't need to right now...so why break something that isn't broken)

Maybe I'm a glutton....but I love polishing stuff. (yeah, yeah...insert joke here)

Oh!
And Shoe?
Is there anything in your world that DOESN'T call for a tea-bagging?!
:D :D :D
 

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I polished up my Amals they a couple of months ago. Just held'em under the polishing wheel. They get some shine but the pot metal does not really shine like aluminum and it loses the shine due to oxidation rather quickly. Of course you could probably clearcoat the surface.
I also saw some polish advertised in Street Rodder magazine that supposedly keeps all the billet nice and shiny by just wiping on. Maybe that would work too.
Mike
 

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I was thinking of polishing my Miks up and removing anything that doesn't need to be there. Try to smooth them out and make them a little less ugly! You can polish anything with the right elbow grease and compound. I made a coil mount for a friend's shovel out of some steel round stock and he polished it until it looked like chrome! I'm sure if you touch it it will oxidize quickly though.
swissmike said:
I polished up my Amals they a couple of months ago. Just held'em under the polishing wheel. They get some shine but the pot metal does not really shine like aluminum and it loses the shine due to oxidation rather quickly. Of course you could probably clearcoat the surface.
I also saw some polish advertised in Street Rodder magazine that supposedly keeps all the billet nice and shiny by just wiping on. Maybe that would work too.
Mike
 

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Neat polishing trick:

-Before your final compound, wash part in dishwasher on high heat.
-Bake clean part at 300 degrees for 20 minutes to bring it up to heat
-Put gloves on, have wheels ready, remove part from oven, polish

The heat keeps the compound from sticking in the little pits you missed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Randy D.... what did you use to get into the tight spots?

Sanding rolls. i guess i forgot to mention that part. Probably because they didnt work real well. Hand sanding was the theme of the day. hahahaaaa
 
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