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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
so i know ironheads are noisy motors, ive had lots of them, but the one im dealing with right now has got a peculiar knocking clatter, kind of sounds like valve clatter on a chevy 350. what makes it peculiar is that it doesent happen when the bike is parked running, reving, or when riding on acceleration. its only on the very last couple of seconds of deceleration right before you come to a stop that it happens. im guessing that the valve springs are wore out because its also causing wear marks on the top of the pushrods. only thing that makes me think different is its peculiar nature. makes me think its in the driveline somewhere, which i have gone throu, and cant see anything wrong other than maybe a wore out clutch bearing. i have put in different rods, adjusted several times, same thing. tried to use a stethoscope but cant verywell do it while im riding it, and its only got one seat. has anybody else ever experienced this?
 

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Have you inspected the camchest? Cam spacing, when loose can make those noises, or a worn out lifter bearing/cam bearing.
 

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similar problem.turned out to be the wrong size piston in the front cylinder.bought the bike used ran fine for about 600 miles before the piston slap came into play.if you dont build it yourself you never know.as far as end play on a cam threads here seem to say most dont shim for end play ,so that probably wont be the issue
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
FT, ahh.

Hogster, I did the cylinder bore and pistons so I know thats right. Its peculiar nature is weird I cant get it to do it unless I ride it, and it only does it for 1-2 seconds on decel right before I stop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
well, it was pretty obvious once i pulled the cam cover what the problem was. aside from the fact that none of the cams were shimmed, pulled the cover off and instantly noticed that the brass bushing for the #2 cam (also the timing gear) was still on the outer end of the cam. somehow the pin broke and the bushing wore loose. the tolerance from cam to bushing is pretty good, but the bushing to outer cover is way out.
 

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Shovit, question for you, how much cam play is tolerable? manuals are very vague on this.
for 76 and earlier, .001-.005. 77 and later, .005-.012, except rear intake, which is .004-.010 Even if it is not the endplay, if you don't shim the cams, they will beat the cam cover bushings to hell and back, filling your oil pump with shreads of bronze.
 

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well, it was pretty obvious once i pulled the cam cover what the problem was. aside from the fact that none of the cams were shimmed, pulled the cover off and instantly noticed that the brass bushing for the #2 cam (also the timing gear) was still on the outer end of the cam. somehow the pin broke and the bushing wore loose. the tolerance from cam to bushing is pretty good, but the bushing to outer cover is way out.
That is what happens, when they are not shimmed correctly. Not to mention what the shavings can do, to the oil pump and crank bearings. Say a prayer to the Harley Gods, that none of it got in the pump or crank. You will need a new bushing, and possibly a cover, if it spun in the housing for long. Get ready to have to ream the bushing too. When you press it in, it will distort a little, sometimes a lot. Also, make sure you pin it in another area, or the pin will walk out and you take the chance of it doing it again. If the new bushing does not fit tightly, you will need to have a oversize(outside of bushing) bearing made, or get a new cam cover.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
the #1 #2 #4 cams were not shimmed at all, and had lots of play. especially because of the fact that the outer bushings were wore straight through to the aluminum cover. oddly enough, i dont see any brass inside the chest. any good ideas on how to get the rest of the bushings out?
 

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You need a blind bearing puller to get them out. Available at any good tool store, and they fit a lot of places on a sportster. Even a cheap one, from any of the "made in china" stores. Then you need a small slide hammer, which you can make with a long bolt that has the same threads as the threads on the blind bearing puller. A heavy piece of pipe or anything you can slide up and down the bolt. Install the blind bearing puller, tighten until it hangs on the inside of the bushing, install the slide hammer and hammer it out. When you install the new bushings, you will need a ream, the size of the cam shaft, shaft, plus clearance, to match the bushing to the cam shaft. That is, if the bushings did not spin in the housing, and the bushings fall into the cam cover. If the bushings do not need pressing in, the cover is shot. If they press in correctly, the cams willnot fit, without reaming. One in a million fit. So be ready to spend a small fortune, just in tools. What year bike, has the points in the side, and the clutch, on the same side? Sounds like somebody put a late sportster cam cover, on a early model 900. Also could be why the cams are not shimmed. Drop me a PM.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
appears original to me. the cam cover has the points on the side, and the seat for the cable on the bottom underside. 1970.

so, when i looking for a reamer (s), how many thousandths over the size ofthe cams should i get?
 
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