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All the parts you need are available, give truett and osborn a call. They were the original guys stroking 900's with k model wheels back before i was even a twinkle in my pops eye. I assume by big bore, you really mean making this a stroker motor? You can only remove so much material from the cases to accomodate larger cylinders before the casting around the base studs is too thin and you end up pulling the base studs right from the cases. How radical are you trying to go? Why did you weld the cases like that? It is hard to believe both base areas would be damaged requiring repairs like that to both of them. You have a lot of work ahead to even make those cases usable in stock form, the tappet block bores need to be machined round and decked true, as well as the bores for the base of the cylinders. Hopefully, shovithead will chime in soon. He has a T&O 900 motor that was fitted with 1000cc cylinders, k model wheels, and 12:1 pistons, that he restored over the course of the past couple of years. He's like a walking encyclopedia. :D
 

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Well, ckunsman89 has it mostly right. T and O will have or make anything you need to make it big bore. He is also right about the studs pulling out, after machining the cylinder sleeve areas. But as for the welding, this does not appear to be a repair, as much as a buildup for the eventual big bore base sleeves. A good machinest can make all of that look close to stock, so no problems there. T and O, should be able, and willing, to give you all the spec's you need to do the machining, and all the parts you need to make it big bore. The 900 engine cases are not the best to make big bore, but we have been doing it every since they came out. Years ago, a friend and I, took a 76 XLCH and installed a set of shovel cylinders, what a nightmare that was. Ran like a scalded dog, and it was a stock bottom end. Hope you keep this thread going, and show your progress. Lots of ironhead guys on here who love this kind of build.
 

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Hi, XLproject,

By the look of this photo, the PO also bored the left case for ball bearing, this means usually 25 x 47 x 12 metric, ref 6005, or equivalent roller bearing, not a std one but available, ref NU1005.



If the PO done that side, most probable he's also bored the drive side... This means special crank shafts, or grind down OEM ones to 25mm OD.

Patrick
 

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He'll need to weld the studs closed and move them out as well. Didn't catch the pinion race,good catch thefrenchowl. It's not looking like a real streetable engine so far. The biggest problem will be getting the trans case to live behind a bunch of torque. Pay particular attention to the area between the c/s bearing and speedo drive fitting.

Too bad Ron Trock's not with us anymore.
 

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4th picture, near the front lifter bore. Have a look at the base bolt hole. Those threads look wiped out. Do you plan on welding the base holes shut to move them out?
 

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Too bad Ron Trock's not with us anymore.

Too bad Ron Trock's not with us anymore.

AMEN to that,
I just landed (from this great forum) a set of TROCK stroker cylinders, the Workmanship is unbelievable..
Poster, not to rain on your Party but be prepared to spend a ton of money if you are to carry out stroking this motor, this is the reality, a better way to go for a street motor is to locate a set of 74 thru 76 cases and make a nice 74 incher using the OEM cylinders X 4 5/8 Flywheels, yes some work will be needed but its a double plus as you will now have beefier cases (no speedo drive issues) and you will not have to weld up the cases behind the pushrods, BUT good luck and keep asking questions..
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I received the case in this condition. All threads look good. The oil drain and the primary drain are helicoiled.

This is the condition of the front cylinder base stud hole...



 

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those are old axtell cylinders... are you sure they it the 900 base pattern? they madeem both ways, 900 and 1000. they were offered in 37/16 and 31/2 bore .i have the exact same ones on mine.with a 4 5/8 stroke. they are very thin and stock height so your really limited on stroke...4 5/8 is max and sketchy because theres theres not much skirt.. so far mine lasted a few thousand very hard miles and scorched a piston skirt. also a lot of em had casting imperfections so check the bores real good . looking back i would probably never do a big bore again..its a shit ton of work and i could have built 3 strokers with the money. also you got to build the trans right, beef up the cases around the speedo hole, youll have to sleeve the head bolt holes for 3/8 bolts,custom head gaskets and pistons.bore and tru the cases and lifter holes find cams big enough to feed the displacement and get the heads to flow the air to take advantage of it.but they are cool.and i think its just missing the right case race. if so youll need a race and a lapper..
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Just went to the basement and tried to put them on my 75 cases. The bolt pattern at the base and top are for a 1000cc set up!

here is a photo of the cylinder with 1000 cc cylinder head...


 

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you got to measure what the bore is on theese now, they cant take much overbore. 4 5/8 is possible but hard and wont last long.. 4.5 would be better. really they were made to be used with stock stroke to even out the bore/stroke relation ship, witch is kind of pointlesss since a harley really cant breath enough to spin a lot of rpms and make power..let alone keeping it together, thats why the pros recommend stroking, take advantage of massive tourqe and gear accordingly, without all the complication of high rpms.
 
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