Jockey Journal Forum banner
1 - 20 of 49 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
626 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
dug this cool old WWII era lathe out from under a pile in the storage garage at work. my super said he's never seen it run in the 23 years he's been here. if i can get it operational i'm stoked.

long shot here, but does anyone have a web tutorial/primer on operating a bench top lathe??

dont really have the time to go take a machining course at the local JC, so i thought maybe one of you wizards might be able to help.

thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
936 Posts
Learning to use it isn't the hard part. Learning what can happen if its not used right is. BEst thing you can do is experiment. Before even considering metal, I would try some wood. Its a little more forgiving. Just try different techniques, don't worry about making something. Lathe use is really one of those things best interactively learned.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
798 Posts
Good for you!!, You got to make sure your basics are ingood working order, electrics, motor, belts. Make sure you know where all your switches are. You'll need cutting tools if you don't have any. Also does it have some sort of lubricating pump? When you cut metals you want to lubricate and cool. I've only fiddle with lathes in college, the Smitty at work is of no use to me without cutting tools. Here's one link http://www.eng.hmc.edu/E8/Shops/Machine/Lathe.htm

and somemore http://www.google.com/search?q=using+a+lathe&btnG=Search&hl=en&lr=&safe=off

One thing, ALLWAY makes sure whatever you lathing it locked in very tight.
Also make sure your project, like your bike is note directly behind you. Things tent to fly off and richochet off the walls.
wear eye protection
an good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
886 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
236 Posts
Since you cant take a course (though highly recomended if you have never even been around one before) look around localy and chances are you will find someone willing to gove you a few hours worth of lesson. When you are piddling around with it trying to figure out what does what, chuck on something to keep the jaws from working out and flying off (takes a while but can happen). Move the saddle (the part of the lathe that moves left and right) as far away from the chuck as you can and start moving stuf around. If its got feed levers, move only one at a time and dont take your hand off of it case if there are any info tags removed, there is no way of knowing what the feed is set at.

Do you have a picture you can post of the lathe? Maybe some of us here can help take the guess work out of what is what as far as levers and stuff go.

Jamie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,840 Posts
Plan to waste a lot of aluminum round rod. Neeevvvvveeerrrrrrr take your hand off the chuck key when it is still in the chuck. You could get a concussion at the very least. Stay out of the path that stock would take as it flies out of the chuck. Ask me how I know. Nevermind... don't.

alteredpilot said:
dug this cool old WWII era lathe out from under a pile in the storage garage at work. my super said he's never seen it run in the 23 years he's been here. if i can get it operational i'm stoked.

long shot here, but does anyone have a web tutorial/primer on operating a bench top lathe??

dont really have the time to go take a machining course at the local JC, so i thought maybe one of you wizards might be able to help.

thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
Watch what you wear when running the lathe, loose shirt sleeves have ended up wound around the workpiece and chuck. Have fun you will love that tool.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
This is a tough one,

First,learn to use a set of mics,calipers,pi tape,dial indicator or any other measuring device for machinists.

Second,if you cant figure out the precision instruments,sell that lathe----or at least give it to one of your "highly skilled,know it all" buddies.Have your keys ready,he will need a trip to the E-room.

Third,I would agree that maybe you should start with wood.Keep in mind that you do have a metal lathe,and your lathe and whatever tooling you may have,might not cut wood (or metal) to your expectations.Don't get discouraged though.

Fourth,get a Machinists Handbook-----forget you even have a lathe.This baby is chock full of useful info that anyone who works with metal once a week needs in his toolbox.This will help you out with speed and feed rates for different types of metals after you feel comfortable running your lathe.

Hope this helps,

Jimmy Diesel
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
630 Posts
Get thee "The Care and Operation of a Lathe" by the Sheldon Machine co., Inc, reprinted by Lindsay Publications, Inc. About $10 last I checked, 100 pages, excellent information.

Lindsay Publications is an excellent source of old machining books, which are highly relevant on the old equipment.

I wouldn't turn wood. Try aluminum.

And be careful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,456 Posts
Ive not used a lathe much and the stuff I do is mostly trial and error at the moment. Heres my lathe.



I have some 2" bar and I want to cut a 1 1/2" bore in it. Is the best way to do this to use a twist drill to cut a large hole in the middle and then take the rest out with a boring bar?

Cheers Dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,652 Posts
Take your time and get to know it. No loose clothing and make sure the chuck is in your hand and not the chuck when you start it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,012 Posts
Even just to turn it on to see if it spins. OIL everything first. Gears, chambers, holes, slides. Every use. Don't expect its good to go. They love oil.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,905 Posts
Since you cant take a course (though highly recomended if you have never even been around one before) look around localy and chances are you will find someone willing to gove you a few hours worth of lesson. When you are piddling around with it trying to figure out what does what, chuck on something to keep the jaws from working out and flying off (takes a while but can happen). Move the saddle (the part of the lathe that moves left and right) as far away from the chuck as you can and start moving stuf around. If its got feed levers, move only one at a time and dont take your hand off of it case if there are any info tags removed, there is no way of knowing what the feed is set at.

Take your time and get to know it. No loose clothing and make sure the chuck is in your hand and not the chuck when you start it.

++++++++1 crashing a lathe is a lot like crashing a bike, it usely doesn't turn out good! i took a machine tool tech class at the local jc, and i don't know how many times a chuck went flying across the room. YOU CAN NOT BE TO FAMILIAR WITH A LATHE!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,104 Posts
I have some 2" bar and I want to cut a 1 1/2" bore in it. Is the best way to do this to use a twist drill to cut a large hole in the middle and then take the rest out with a boring bar?

Cheers Dan
Easiest way is to buy a chunk of 2" tube w/ a 1/4" wall. On solid bar stock start with a small bit and work yourself up to larger bits.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,736 Posts
Along with the loose clothing, I'd never wear gloves while standing at the lathe either, unless they're the Mechannix type gloves that are basically form fitting. I've seen the leather work gloves pull peoples hands in twice even though they were told not to wear them. Luckily it basically tore the glove in half both times and just left the guys with bruised hands, but it could have been MUCH worse. I'd have someone who know what they're doing come over to your place and give you a quick tutorial. Lots of ways to do expensive damage to your equipment if you don't have a clue what you're doing, even with the old heavy duty WWII stuff. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
I make my living with machine tools, so my outlook & bias is different, but were I you, I'd suck up to somebody who's already been properly trained and has experience operating a lathe for a little one on one training/mentoring. Engine lathes, even tiny ones, are not tolerant of a lack of experience and mistakes made can get real bad, real fast.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
428 Posts
I did what anvil said,a few friends came round and gave me the basics and still have all my fingers etc I just practiced on stuff and over the last 15mths I have got pretty confident on it and it has to be one of the best bits of gear I have ever brought ,the only thing they didn't warn me about was all the expensive tooling I would have to buy lol.
 
1 - 20 of 49 Posts
Top