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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My T140 slipped with the clutch that was in it when I got it running, so I put in some new friction plates (the red ones) and Barnett springs, it was unridable it slipped so bad. So I sanded on some glass the best 6 steel plates I have from a pile, put in the best used stock plates I have and the Barnett springs. Its actually the best its been, but still slips bad in 3rd when you get on it.

What have you guys used that can take a beating and still grab? this is pissing me off, i just want it to work.
 

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Sorry for your troubles. I am no clutch expert but i think your problem solution is just stronger springs. Or your ways of doing the set up is off. I myself have have a T140 750 and i have never heard of a stock clutch failing to do it's job. Even on the 650s.

Save your money and wait for some better advice from the guys on the board.
 

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I don't recall any slipping plates until they were well worn. When I got to that stage I bought a "Stuffer plate" from Jammer and never had a problem again. It's still in there today.

But wait....I have a complete stack on my spares shelf; Is that from another bike or did I do something else that I don't recall.....:confused:

It's hell getting old cuz you forget the good stuff but NEVER the bad stuff!
 

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Bigblockdude, on T-140's the engine oil is shared by the primary(clutch) so the wrong oil will make it slip. Valvoline 20-50 Motorcycle oil works good, on the container it states"for wet clutches". Jack
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Bigblockdude, on T-140's the engine oil is shared by the primary(clutch) so the wrong oil will make it slip. Valvoline 20-50 Motorcycle oil works good, on the container it states"for wet clutches". Jack
Have the valvoline for wet clutches in there.
I don't get it either.
My bro has the same springs in his 650, no problem. I just bought a crusty 650, adjusted the primary chain, cleaned out the everything and put it back together with my old 750 springs, they looked better than in the 650. That clutch works great, no slip at all. But its 69 motor with a sealed primary and I run ATF in there.
Though my T140 has a lot more low end torque than either 650. It has aftermarket pistons, I believe 9 to 1, and I had to mill the head 10 or so thou to get it strait. Its a 78 with the strait port head too. this fucker hauls. Maybe I need something better than stock?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Check your basket for wear and the isolator Rubbers inside also. Maybe it needs some new.parts besides clutch and steel plates but new steels are needed periodically too. Clutch bearing and thrust washer too?
I had it all apart when I went through the motor, and its good, no wear on the basket or hub, washer is good.
The steels look like new.
What brand of clutches are you guys using that seem to work?
 

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on many of the race 750's you need to run a pre-unit 4 spring clutch center on it the handle the power, on most we put a breather in the front mount the put the pre 70 crank seal in there and run ATF in the primary so the plates won't slip,
If you want to be done with all the leaks and slipping put a Bob Newby Racing belt drive and you'll have no more clutch problems.
 

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I think I'm running Barnetts in my hot-rod 750. It puts out way more power than a stock 750 and I've had zero clutch problems. It's an early engine but I set it up to breathe through the primary and I run Bel-Ray 20/50 semi-synthetic. I don't really recall whether it's a 3 or 4 spring clutch, but whatever it is I just slapped it together and it worked.

A few tips: Make sure the steel plates are flat. You can also bead blast the steel plates in improve grip. Make sure the springs are turned in far enough and that the plate runs true. The best way to check this is to sit on the bike, pull the clutch in, then look straight down at the pressure plate while kicking over the transmission (with the kick starter). There should be no wobble in the pressure plate as it rotates. Using a dial indicator on the pressure plate is ideal, but a visual check will usually do it.
Check the free length of the springs as per the manual. They can collapse over time.
Also, once the friction plates have slipped, it's hard to save them.
When installing new plates, soak in ATF prior to installation.
And of course, make sure there's the proper amount of play between the actuating push rod and the pressure plate. That's the adjustment at the center of the pressure plate. Obviously, if it's too tight, that's instant clutch slip. (See manual.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I think I'm running Barnetts in my hot-rod 750. It puts out way more power than a stock 750 and I've had zero clutch problems. It's an early engine but I set it up to breathe through the primary and I run Bel-Ray 20/50 semi-synthetic. I don't really recall whether it's a 3 or 4 spring clutch, but whatever it is I just slapped it together and it worked.

A few tips: Make sure the steel plates are flat. You can also bead blast the steel plates in improve grip. Make sure the springs are turned in far enough and that the plate runs true. The best way to check this is to sit on the bike, pull the clutch in, then look straight down at the pressure plate while kicking over the transmission (with the kick starter). There should be no wobble in the pressure plate as it rotates. Using a dial indicator on the pressure plate is ideal, but a visual check will usually do it.
Check the free length of the springs as per the manual. They can collapse over time.
Also, once the friction plates have slipped, it's hard to save them.
When installing new plates, soak in ATF prior to installation.
And of course, make sure there's the proper amount of play between the actuating push rod and the pressure plate. That's the adjustment at the center of the pressure plate. Obviously, if it's too tight, that's instant clutch slip. (See manual.)
All done, I'm actually not new to working on these. Just need some good clutches. I had converted my brothers 71 motor with a crank seal and ATF. I just may do that to mine eventually. Thanks
 

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Why would you soak the f plates in oil Glider? Oil is for the chain. One tip I can give is not to go by the oil level hole, especially with our custom bikes sitting at slightly/radically different levels, get a torch and SEE where the chain (at the rear) is just submerged in oil with bike upright and looking through the timing cover. OK thats not for shared engine oil which I tried on my bike once, worst thing I ever did. Breathing through the front cavity is the go but obviously thats a big deal unless you're stripping the motor but you've gotta find somewhere else for a breather, use a reed valve to acheive neg c/case pressure as well.
4 springs would have to be better than 3.
Newbys clutch better again.
Not really helping you much, spring pressure seems the issue though if all else is right.
Cheers
Browny
 

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Those red clutch plates from ebay and other places are shit! It wont make a difference what you do, those red plates will slip, the material is too hard and they wont work. Get some Barnett plates and be done with it.
 

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ATF, not oil--big difference
 
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