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Actually it was only HD that threatened their rim supplier. Crocker had to get their rims from Indian after that. Crocker had a deal with Indian and actually suppled a few parts to Indian such as their steering dampeners. There's two Crockers in northern Minnesota sitting in a shed owned by an old dude that won't part with them. The Crocker factory is still standing in LA. I took a photo of it about 10 years ago or so which I posted on this site back then and somehow it showed up on the Crocker website.

Not being a dick here but do a little research and you'll see what the big deal is about crocker. He and paul bigsby (look him too he's a genius) built crockers in LA . they offered a money back guarantee to anyone who lost a race to a Harley or indian. there were only about 200 crockers built but no one ever claimed the refund. HD and indian were so scared that they threatened their wheel and tire suppliers to make them stop selling to crocker. from then on he had to sell his bikes as kits, without rims and tires. there were only about 200 built so they are very rare and a complete bike can be upwards of $250K. Lots of innovative stuff and very fast. paul bigsby 's hand made guitars are super rare and worth more than the motorcycles. he is also the inventor of the bigsby tremolo , used on electric guitars.
as far as dale walksler, I've never met him but on every video I've seen he comes off as a pretty cool guy in my opinion.
 

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Actually it was only HD that threatened their rim supplier. Crocker had to get their rims from Indian after that. Crocker had a deal with Indian and actually suppled a few parts to Indian such as their steering dampeners. There's two Crockers in northern Minnesota sitting in a shed owned by an old dude that won't part with them. The Crocker factory is still standing in LA. I took a photo of it about 10 years ago or so which I posted on this site back then and somehow it showed up on the Crocker website.
funny about the steering dampener. I was at the indian museum the other day and I wondered about the crocker dampener i saw.
 

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I re-started Crocker Motorcycle Company in 1997. Recently I've been asked to contribute to a new book on the original Crocker Motorcycles and I've been able to come up with a lot of great new information but I'm always looking for more, (like that old guy in Minnesota with two in the barn). Really, what I'm looking for is historical information, old original photos, brochures, pamphlets, stories, etc.. Please don't send me to the new Crocker web site, I wrote most of what's on there and dug up most of those pictures and memorabilia. As a matter of fact, I did the article on "Crocker Jack" and even coined the name for him. Any help would be acknowledged in the book and photo credits will go to anyone who owns the original negatives (or original photos). Even serial numbers with a general description for any "unknown" Crockers would be great. As for those two in Minnesota........

I also know Crockers inside out and there is only a handful of parts used that were from other manufacturers, you guys touched on most of them.

Crockers were also used, not only in Speedway racing, but hill climbs, endurance (enduro) racing, speed record runs, and there are rumors that the engines were used in sprint car racing. That'd be sweet if someone can get me a picture of one used elswhere, like "The Wall Of Death", or sprint car racing.
 

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This is 40-61-117 , supposedly owned by Elmo Looper, problem is the Engine number is dodgy as hell and Elmo never owned a Crocker with a cantilever seat + frame, no one did. Ernie Skelton made those seats and the tail light from the Bigsby drawings. He built dozens.
This bike supposedly has 1947 papers, problem, that aint Elmo's bike + probably not his signature.
Elmo's son is still around. Elmo's 2 sisters and 1 brother are still around.
Elmo never bought the remains of the Crocker inventory because there was none. Factory was taken over in 1946 by AAA Electric motor service, Rob Maloney.
No photos exist of a 1941 or 1942 Crocker, Paul Bigsby left in 1941, Gene Rhyne not long after. They were the last 2 mechanics. Woody Mount was foreman after Bigsby and converted the factory for War contracts.

The reason a book has not been written about Crocker is because the amount of BS from Vernon and Sucher + the number of replica bikes. 'The Motorcyclist' magazine debut 1936 , Al Crocker had orders for 12 bikes for the year.
4-1/2 yr x 12 = 54 units. The Crocker register has 72 bikes listed + 4 more since 2010.

Chuck Vernon sold this bike for a packet even though it is a replica. The guy who bought it got sucked in for 3 of them
Wheel Fuel tank Tire Plant Automotive tire


Schacht's bike was built about 2011 and its stamped # 42.80.400, "1942" well done Michael
Pay the guy who built the bike and probably straighten out the engine stamp with DMV
 
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