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Discussion Starter #1
So Ive been doing some work on my triumph frame for my first build. Ive been going through the frame and taking off the stock brackets, tabs etc etc.

I cut the two lugs off the steering neck as well as the fork stops. The lugs on the neck went through so I had to weld it in. I tryed my best to grind it back down flush and smooth, and it came out pretty nice, but when you step back and look at it, its a little wavy I suppose.

Id like it to look as close to perfect as possible, so I guess this is where you would use bondo or body fillers.

So my question is what should I use to clean it up, what are some good fillers, or tips and info.

Thanks for the help guys.
 

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Reallly depends on if you intend to powdercoat the frame when your done. If so, you need to use something that has a metallic base to it. I hear jb weld will accept powdercoat. You could also use "All Metal" filler, which is an aluminum powder based body filler, pretty kick ass stuff.
 

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Yep depends on how you want to do a final finish on what products to use....
 

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When I paint a frame, I use the Bondo or 3M brand of spot putty. It comes in a tube. Now thats just for a tiny skim coat going over a ground down weld as you said, or dressing a factory weld. I've never had any trouble with that stuff comming out/bubbling etc. For deeper gouges I prefer to use the Bondo brand fiberglass, it's alot stronger than regualor Bondo filler. Then you can put some spot putty over that if you have any pinholes.

As with any paint and bodywork, prep is the key, make sure your working with clean metal before adding anykind of filler.

Sixball
 

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If you're painting the frame then filler will be fine. I used Bondo premium filler for all the molding on my last frame. On other frames I've used chopped short strand fiberglass filler with fine body filler over it to smooth it out, and liquid metal on one frame to smooth out welds. All worked well and have stood up fine.
 

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Supercrouton needs to pipe in here. He did say it's ultra thin in the neck area. Not sure what it looked like after he welded it in though.
 

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I would not suggest spot putty from a tube. Since it isnt catalyzed, it never truly hardens. So says a certified bondo artiste!

I use Evercoat Quantum in my shop. It is easy to sand, and has a bit of flexibility after it is cured, perfect for parts that move around a bit like cycle fenders {and auto bumper covers!} Has hot and cold temperature hardener options.

I also use Evercoat Glazing Putty, keep a can around for when I get caught short on Quantum.
 

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I've used Evercoat Rage filler for several years and really like it. Easy to work and feathers out nice. Its kind of expensive, but most of my work is confined to bikes so I'm not using large quantities of it and don't mind paying a little more for a product that works well for me. Get your filler built up to where you need it, and then rasp or file it down close to your finished profile before you start sanding on it. The closer I can get the surface by rasping or filing the better I like it because it means less sanding!

Regards,
Geo.
 

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I would not suggest spot putty from a tube. Since it isnt catalyzed, it never truly hardens. So says a certified bondo artiste!

I use Evercoat Quantum in my shop. It is easy to sand, and has a bit of flexibility after it is cured, perfect for parts that move around a bit like cycle fenders {and auto bumper covers!} Has hot and cold temperature hardener options.

I also use Evercoat Glazing Putty, keep a can around for when I get caught short on Quantum.
It'a a two part product. Tube with the putty, and then you use the included small tube of hardner, just like regular bondo.

Sixball
 

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If you want to go the "Full Metal" route, Eastwood sells a lead free body solder kit. It's a lot less toxic than old school lead.
 

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I would not suggest spot putty from a tube. Since it isnt catalyzed, it never truly hardens. So says a certified bondo artiste!

I use Evercoat Quantum in my shop. It is easy to sand, and has a bit of flexibility after it is cured, perfect for parts that move around a bit like cycle fenders {and auto bumper covers!} Has hot and cold temperature hardener options.

I also use Evercoat Glazing Putty, keep a can around for when I get caught short on Quantum.
that's what I use at the body shop too. shits awesome. hard to believe it's better than their rage "x-treme", but it is...

I second evercoat products
I third it. I quite literally sand this shit every fucking day...

-A.
 

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In the cabinet shop i use regular old bondo brand as long as i have my belt sander to knock it down ,on every thing else hands down Evercoat .
 

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I third it. I quite literally sand this shit every fucking day...

-A.[/QUOTE]

HAHA. I USED to sand it everyday as well, I don't miss the bodyshop work as a full time job.
 

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I've used permabond(or something similar), a 2-part epoxy as a filler on rigid steel parts, like frame welds. It's the kind that you shoot out of a caulk-style gun, and it mixes the two parts itself in the disposable tip. Not as easy to sand, but the stuff is rock hard.
 

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Supercrouton needs to pipe in here. He did say it's ultra thin in the neck area. Not sure what it looked like after he welded it in though.
If you insist :D Here is a pic of the neck after only a little welding and smoothing...

 
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