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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Mine took a crap this weekend and must have blown a bushing or spacer because I can move the shaft itself up and down about about a 1/4" making for constantly inaccurate timing. Does have insight on removing the gear and rebuilding the rest of the assembly? Keep in mind I Am not referring to the points, condenser or advance weights
 

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There are 2 bushings that the shaft runs in.If you look at the gear you will see that it is secured to the shaft with a small roll pin.drift the pin out,remove the gear and the shaft will come out.I have found that H.D parts dont fit a lot of the aftermarket timers and vice versa.
 

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There are two fits to concentrate on.

1) Radial - how much side-to-side slop does the inner have relative to the housing? This is remedied by installing and sizing new bushings which has already been mentioned. Close fit here ensures the points cam runs true and you get consistent point openings. Of course, you could move to a contactless setup like Dyna S and not care so much about this fit. The rotor's not gonna hit the pickup no matter what.

2) Axial - how much does the shaft move up and down in the housing. I believe this is the more important one. As the shaft is driven by a steep helical gear, any up and down motion is translated in to angular movement of the shaft. That is, it has a wide range of advance/retard variance as it hops up and down. This one's also the easiest to fix. Tap out the roll pin that holds the gear on, remove the gear, make a new washer that is thick enough to limit the up and down movement to a few thou or so.

These parts aren't taking critical loads nor will result in catastrophic engine failures if not done perfectly so go ahead and have at it. Just make sure the roll pin in tightly in place when you put the gear back on.

Jason
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
jason, i'm getting the axial slop that you mentioned. That's exactly what's happening, the slop allows the shaft to turn enough to advance the timing when kicking it making it not want to start and kicking back all the time. Two questions - should I replace the pin or reuse it assuming i remove it without damaging it, and you should I use any kind of loc-tite on the pin for reassembly?
 

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Alex said:
jason, i'm getting the axial slop that you mentioned. Two questions - should I replace the pin or reuse it assuming i remove it without damaging it, and you should I use any kind of loc-tite on the pin for reassembly?
You can reuse the pin if you don't mangle it (unless you work for Rolls-Royce or Lycoming making aircraft engines, then by all means replace it). It doesn't take much force to punch out the roll pin. As long as it had decent grip when you reinsert, you don't need any glue. Pep Boys sells an entire assortment of roll pins for under $10 if you're the type to worry about it ;-0

Use common sense. . . if you can push the pin in with your fingers, it's too loose.

Jason
 
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