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The radial lines in the counter sunk holes are from a counter-sink cutter with the correct angle for the bolts being used. I am a CNC machinist and this is how manufacturing produces those features. You will never get a perfectly smooth surface (cutter wear) or a perfect bolt circle (all machines have positioning tolerance). I believe that a sprotor can work because chain oil/wax flies off in a outward pattern unless you drench your chain with oil when it is sitting. Harley also proved that you can have a brake and sprocket connected, just look at old sportsters. They work just fine. Just my 2 cents.
 

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Quote from Exilecycles.com

We are frequently asked whether oil from the chain causes a problem. Firstly, with modern 'O'-ring chains you cannot lube the joints as they are sealed. You need simply to keep the side-plates clean. Tsubaki even says you can run them dry! Fly-off from the chain is in an outward direction, so contamination only occurs during lubing, if you do lube your chain. If it does, wipe it off. Finally, if some oil makes it onto the braking surface it burns off immediately. In reality, therefore, the contamination issue does not cause a problem. The Europeans have been using Sprocket Brakes for years. We use RK heavy duty nickel-plated 'O'ring chains on our bikes; great looks, low maintenance

I have never understood why anyone would want their brakes near an oily chain. Even chain wax get flung around. I just don't get it...

Custom is cool. But only if it works at least as good as what it is replacing. I'm keeping my brake rotor, it works!
 

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People, let's try to stick with facts, here.

Older Sportsters (and big twins) ran DRUM brakes with sprockets on them. The drum protected the brake surface from grease. Tapered bolts need a certain degree of precision to ensure contact at the tapers. If so many of these hadn't come loose I'd just say well, it's good enough, but since so many have....

When I was at MMI (20 years ago) they told me to clean ALL brake rotors I come into contact with using alcohol based cleaners to avoid contaminants. I, personally, prefer that to "It'll burn off anyway" from the guy who's getting rich selling them, but maybe that's just me?

Nobodies attacking anyone personally for choosing sprotors. If you feel good about your's, then fine. I just feel strongly about this, because I've seen so many guys get sold these things without a hint of truth involved. Then, when they come apart the customer is shocked! No one should be shocked that a sprotor failed. So many have failed that I am surprised when one works for very long at all!

My motivation is to prevent people from locking up their rear wheels and ending up on the median. At least if I speak up, they will know it's possible. If your motivation is to justify your personal investment in a product, or to help sell a product, then I tend to doubt the veracity of your stance.

Yes sprotors can work to some degree. Yes they might last longer given certain riding styles and conditions. No you cannot install them and have as much faith in them as a conventional brake, PERIOD! I've seen conventional set ups fail (actually only pulleys/sprockets, never rotors), but it's almost always incorrect installation. I've installed sprotors with all the care I can muster and found 'em loose a coupla thousand miles later. I warn anyone who want's these things about the known dangers, because it's my job to.
 

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Your Lucky!

You used the wrong bolts to hold the sprocket on and now blame the manufacturer???

This thread is done.

-Jason

Was riding and sprotor just Blew apart. Best that i can tell. the caliper bracket is gone! Nothing their. everything was tight/straight and lined up. Locked my rear wheel up on the Highway and put me into a grass Median


 
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