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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’ve got a few questions about swapping a cone shovel to a mag setup.

I have a 78, 88” kick only shovel in a rigid frame. It currently has points. When I put it together, I went overboard on the charging system and got the 50 amp cycle electric setup. I know that’s way overkill for a bike with almost no electrical demand. Anyway, if I was to swap to a mag, would I be able to keep my charging system? I know the bike still needs power, but I wonder if this will still work without a battery.

my other question is which magneto would I be better off with? Is a hunt magneto inferior to a Morris? Thanks!
 

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you do not need any charging system at all for the mag to work,
it is a totally independent unit,
in fact the quickest & about the only way to wreck a magneto is to put power into it !!!....
*NEVER WIRE A MAGNETO TO YOUR HARNESS !!,....
so run the charging you have, but keep it seperte from the rest of the bikes electrics, IF OVER-CHARGING ride with lights on, it might help to use escess produced power, but on that I am not 100% sure.....
MORRIS Magnetos in my opinion ARE the best, hunt seems to be in bed with V-Twin now so will be mde in Tiawan with low grade materials,
Dave at Morris ONLY sells High Quality, Made in the USA (well,...... New Jersey anyway hahahahaha !!)
I'm not saying Hunt's are total crap, they are not, but theres a reason they are cheaper & still using older casting designs & componants,.... Morris only uses as state of the art componants that a Magneto can have if you know what i mean,....
also if using a BURKHARDT nose cone, unless youbuy genuine Harley or Morris drive gears ,they jam & dont work from the box, where as if you use a Morris nose cone it will bolt on & work in one.
Yes, Morris is more expensive, but in my book, WELL worth spending on.......
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ok. So I’ll still need a battery for everything but the ignition. That clears up a lot. I suppose a very small battery would be enough.
 

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i'm not sure about small batteries with high output alternators, they were usually used on glides with a thousand lights, radio etc, might be too hot for basic lights & signals if thats all your powering
usually you need to match the two to each other, but basically i cant see why not, an electric wizzard will pipe up soon with that advice with luck
 

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If you want to run a small battery, with minimal electrical system, and not have issues down the line with the battery, put a low output alternator set up in it. Spend the money now to avoid a lot of headache later. You don't need or want more than 22 amp charging system.
 

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Now, the regulator does have to match the output of the generator. Don't regulators switch off the field when the voltage is high enough and the battery is fully charged and just have the armature spinning and not flowing any amps?
 

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I can wire a bike 100% perfectly using new or known good units, but to me WHY individual items work & do what they do & whats compatable with, is like magic to me, so i stick with stock so i know it works,
I know on older 3 brush generators that you adjust the output by sliding the 3rd brush around as desired for more or less output, & that the battery itself & its capacity amp wise is part of the system, I beleive it acts as a 'power sink' for any over-charge produced by the charging system, as well as an 'exciter' to produce sparky stuff, without it exciting the coils it won't produce
you have an altanator system not a generator system & they are a lot better, simple & reliable but i still think it all needs to be ballanced,
 

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The solid state regulators used with an alternator do not simply "switch off the field". The magnets in the rotor are constantly spinning around the copper windings in the armature and are continuously generating alternating current (AC) within them. If the current is not allowed to flow, the energy will build up as heat in the windings till they melt and short out. The regulator contains diodes which rectify this AC to DC output, and then a regulator circuit allows a certain amount to flow to the battery to maintain its charge. Any excess energy is dissipated through internal resistors in the regulator and rejected as heat from the fins on the regulator. The fins are small, and can only handle so much heat dissipation, so the alternator needs to be matched to the requirements of the bike as closely as possible to prevent issues. If the alternator is generating too much power, the regulator will burn out sooner than later, probably boiling the battery dry and possibly shorting out the alternator stator windings as well.
 
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