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Old 01-01-2011, 12:19 PM   #1
Frank D
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Default Build Thread: 1967 Triumph

Well, here I go. I'm finally starting to accumulate some parts and want to get this build going.

I haven't titled this thread 'custom,' 'bobber,' 'chopper,' etc., simply because I'm not sure exactly what direction this build will take. I have an idea of where I want to go and I'm more concerned with staying true to that concept than I am with what to call it.

Here are some old pictures which I have probably posted in various threads on this board throughout the year. Later on today I will try to get together some pics of where I stand right now.

These pictures are mainly ones taken by the guy I bought this basket case from. As you can see I have a new cylinder which came with the motor (the last owner bought this because of cracks in the original fins).

The bike also came with a disk front hub but I am not going to run this. Instead I am opting for a conical front hub which I bought on here from a fellow JJ member. I am in the process of polishing the hub...I'll post some pics later.
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Old 01-01-2011, 01:05 PM   #2
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Default Re: Build Thread: 1967 Triumph

So here are some more pictures of where I stand right now.

I had the frame blasted and discovered some nastiness. The hardtail has some holes which I'm sure I could weld...however looking at it as a whole I think I'd rather just replace it with a David Bird or Factory Metal Works.

As you can see someone removed the support that the head steadies mount to. I plan on replacing this but I'm not sure exactly what type of tubing to use. Could anyone tell me what exact type of tubing should be used for this??? I have checked out all of the supply websites that have been recommended but the enormous amount of options make my head spin...

Also check out my conical hub. For christmas my uncle bought me a flex-shaft grinder/polisher from the Eastwood catalogue. It is getting there but I still have a lot more to go in order to get all of the scratches out.

Last but not least, I have the triples for my 70's conical front end set up. Here you can see the adaptor that is required to but this front end on a late 60's frame.

I also have some pics of other Christmas gifts posted here. I have got a Hobart Handler 140 (this is the same welder that we use at my uncle's body shop and I can't say enough about it for a 110V machine). I have a pic of my motor mounts from Lowbrow as well!!!
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Old 01-01-2011, 01:08 PM   #3
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Default Re: Build Thread: 1967 Triumph

Some more pics.
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Old 01-01-2011, 01:16 PM   #4
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Default Re: Build Thread: 1967 Triumph

And a few more...
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Old 01-01-2011, 01:28 PM   #5
gapwelder
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Default Re: Build Thread: 1967 Triumph

I would repair the hardtail vs. replacing it.
GW
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Old 01-01-2011, 01:35 PM   #6
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Default Re: Build Thread: 1967 Triumph

Looking at it I see that it would be a fairly easy fix, but I want to go with a +4" hardtail with a 2-2.5 inch drop and I'm not really sure exactly what I have here. I suppose that I could mock the bike up see how it works out and then if I'm not happy I could go with t a new hardtail
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Old 01-01-2011, 02:01 PM   #7
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Default Re: Build Thread: 1967 Triumph

The strut that is missing is 1" od. tubing not sure of the wall thickness. You should be able to find something locally, steel supply, fab shop. etc. Looks like the boss on the casting has been cut off as well............
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Old 01-01-2011, 03:01 PM   #8
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Yea someone really butchered the brace around the neck. It looks like that wanted to mold the neck and decided to just fill it with a bunch of weld. I know that when I weld in the new pipe I will need to get the old brazing out of the area first. Does anyone know the best method for doing this?? Should I just use a torch and sweat the brazing out of there or will this affect the entire neck?
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Old 01-01-2011, 05:24 PM   #9
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Default Re: Build Thread: 1967 Triumph

Blow out what you can with a torch, then MIG the new tube in. Shape the end of the tube so that you can get it as far into what's left of the boss as possible.

It sucks that the boss is gone, I've had good luck cleaning the old tube out of the boss with a hole saw and just sliding the new one in.
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Old 01-01-2011, 05:43 PM   #10
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Default Re: Build Thread: 1967 Triumph

Hillbillyhell, I see that you have done lots of frame work... what type of tubing should I use here?? When I check out most supply websites there are a million options. Is there a certain tubing size that is generally used by most builders?
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Old 01-03-2011, 10:27 PM   #11
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Default Re: Build Thread: 1967 Triumph

Today I took the front forks (early 70's conical hub) apart.... real nasty inside. I don't think the rebuild will be much trouble but my next obstacle will be figuring out how much I need to cut the fork tubes and whether it is worth sending them out to Frank's or just seeing if my machinist and rethread the inside of the newly cut tube...any suggestions.

Also, can anyone offer any suggestions on calculating ride height. For example is there anyway to estimate how long my front forks will extend when assembled an under the weight of the full assembled motorcycle? Or would you guys assemble the entire motorcycle and in my case rebuild the forks with new tubes, seals, etc and then disassemble to forks and cut them in order to achieve proper ride height. It seems like a real pain in the ass but then again I don't know if I'd really want to "estimate" how much to cut from new fork tubes. Any input?
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Old 01-03-2011, 11:10 PM   #12
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Default Re: Build Thread: 1967 Triumph

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank D View Post
So here are some more pictures of where I stand right now.

I had the frame blasted and discovered some nastiness. The hardtail has some holes which I'm sure I could weld...however looking at it as a whole I think I'd rather just replace it with a David Bird or Factory Metal Works.

As you can see someone removed the support that the head steadies mount to. I plan on replacing this but I'm not sure exactly what type of tubing to use. Could anyone tell me what exact type of tubing should be used for this??? I have checked out all of the supply websites that have been recommended but the enormous amount of options make my head spin...

Also check out my conical hub. For christmas my uncle bought me a flex-shaft grinder/polisher from the Eastwood catalogue. It is getting there but I still have a lot more to go in order to get all of the scratches out.

Last but not least, I have the triples for my 70's conical front end set up. Here you can see the adaptor that is required to but this front end on a late 60's frame.

I also have some pics of other Christmas gifts posted here. I have got a Hobart Handler 140 (this is the same welder that we use at my uncle's body shop and I can't say enough about it for a 110V machine). I have a pic of my motor mounts from Lowbrow as well!!!
Make sure you preheat the metal if you plan on doing any welding on your frame with that 110v. They just arnt made for anything more than sheet metal.
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Old 01-04-2011, 01:06 AM   #13
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Default Re: Build Thread: 1967 Triumph

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Originally Posted by Frank D View Post
Hillbillyhell, I see that you have done lots of frame work... what type of tubing should I use here?? When I check out most supply websites there are a million options. Is there a certain tubing size that is generally used by most builders?
Just grab some 1x.120 ERW, .095 wall would work fine as well. You don't need to worry about using DOM tubing or anything.
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Old 01-04-2011, 01:12 AM   #14
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Default Re: Build Thread: 1967 Triumph

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Today I took the front forks (early 70's conical hub) apart.... real nasty inside. I don't think the rebuild will be much trouble but my next obstacle will be figuring out how much I need to cut the fork tubes and whether it is worth sending them out to Frank's or just seeing if my machinist and rethread the inside of the newly cut tube...any suggestions.

Also, can anyone offer any suggestions on calculating ride height. For example is there anyway to estimate how long my front forks will extend when assembled an under the weight of the full assembled motorcycle? Or would you guys assemble the entire motorcycle and in my case rebuild the forks with new tubes, seals, etc and then disassemble to forks and cut them in order to achieve proper ride height. It seems like a real pain in the ass but then again I don't know if I'd really want to "estimate" how much to cut from new fork tubes. Any input?
I do it last myself. At least wait until you have the bike as a roller. Once you're rolling, put a zip tie around one of the fork tubes, then pull the front of the bike down to where you want it using a rachet strap or something. Let it go and measure how much your zip tie moved, thats how much you need to whack out of the tubes. Since you don't do it every day it's probably better to do this than guess.

By the way before you do all that, figure out how much the forks move with the riders weight and subtract that amount from your measurement...if you set the bike dead level without a rider it's gonna be all goofy when you get on it. Lots of dudes make that mistake.
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Old 01-08-2011, 01:05 PM   #15
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Default Re: Build Thread: 1967 Triumph

Rear Hub Question:

My bike came with two rear hubs and (drum style) sprockets and I need some advice in which (if either) would be best to use.

The first set up is what I believe to be call a 'quick disconnect' hub. This has a spline that connects the hub to the sprocket (46 tooth).


The second hub simply has eight bolts that connect the hub to the sprocket (43 tooth). The previous owner had begun lacing this to rim--so I am assuming that this is what he intended to use; however I think that I need to redo the lacing anyway so it won't be a big issue to change to the other hub if that's what I decide is best.

Interestingly, when I used my micrometer to measure the housing on each that would hold the bearing they were slightly off from each other. The spline style hub came out to be 47.45mm and the bolt up style hub came out to be 46.77mm. Now, I don't know if this difference was from human error on my part or if they do in fact hold different bearings. I was just confused because I assumed that these were both Triumph applications and I thought that rear wheel bearings for Triumphs were the same size throughout unit construction???

So, is there any real difference in which style hub I choose to use? Between the spline and bolt up hubs is there one that is inherently better than the other? And what number tooth on the rear sprocket is recommended? Obviously I would like to use one of the sprockets that I have; however my main concern right now is which hub to use...I can always buy another rear sprocket...

Finally (as if I haven't already asked an overwhelming number of questions) since I am in the process of having my motor rebuilt should I change my front sprocket to a certain tooth number? I don't have the motor with me so I can't say how many teeth are on it now, but I'm assuming it is stock. I remember some talk on the board about guys changing their front sprockets for a more desirable gear ratio. I intend on putting some miles on this bike. Although I will be doing some short hops around town I will also be doing a good amount of highway miles on the bike since my house is about 35 miles from work.

Thanks for the feedback...here are some pics.
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Old 01-08-2011, 02:46 PM   #16
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Default Re: Build Thread: 1967 Triumph

I'd defiitely use the standard hub and drum on your bike. If you happen to need anything to use that Q.D setup it'll cost dearly, if you can find it at all. The other is very common. Are the sprockets bolted to the drums? If not you want the smaller sprocket for sure. Collectors love those qd setups, if it's complete you can sell easily, and do real well. Dave.
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Old 01-08-2011, 05:01 PM   #17
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Default Re: Build Thread: 1967 Triumph

I am curious what direction this is gonna take..looking forward to watching the progress.
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Old 01-09-2011, 06:59 AM   #18
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I'd defiitely use the standard hub and drum on your bike. If you happen to need anything to use that Q.D setup it'll cost dearly, if you can find it at all. The other is very common. Are the sprockets bolted to the drums? If not you want the smaller sprocket for sure. Collectors love those qd setups, if it's complete you can sell easily, and do real well. Dave.
What I meant to say is that the whole drum sprocket assembly is bolted to the hub. Thanks for the feedback. You reaffirmed what I was thinking about the bolt up vs. QD hub assembly.

In reference to the QD set up I have to check next time I'm home but I think that I have most of it. I know that I have the hub and the drum/sprocket assembly for sure... not sure about the rest of it. It's nice to know that there is a market for them...maybe trading/selling it will help me get some more parts to keep this build moving.
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Old 01-09-2011, 08:41 AM   #19
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Default Re: Build Thread: 1967 Triumph

looks good
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Old 01-12-2011, 12:42 PM   #20
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Default Re: Build Thread: 1967 Triumph

Has anyone successfully laced a conical hub to a Harley 21-2.15 rim???

My engine builder hooked me up with a Harley Rim that measures T21-2.15 TLA. I want to lace this to my front conical hub (pictured above). I called Buchannan's and they said that they can supply me with spokes for this application; however, when I asked about whether the angle of the hole in the Harley rim would work correctly with the Triumph conical hub and their spokes they said that that was up to me to figure out.

I read one guy on here saying that he tried it and it didn't work but i was wondering if anyone here has had any success lacing a triumph conical hub to a harley 21-2.15 rim??
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