1968 TR6C wheel building - The Jockey Journal Board

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Old 08-07-2014, 01:11 PM   #1
cdgarg
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Default 1968 TR6C wheel building

I'm currently lacing stock front and rear hubs to 18"/19" stainless devon rims. Buchanan has confirmed my lacing is correct. After dishing the wheel to center it (david bird 4" stretch?2"drop hardtail), I have too much spoke protruding in the drive side. Buchanan spokes have 5/8" of thread and they state that no more than 3/16" should protrude. Some of the spokes are protruding as much as 3/8". I measured spoke lengths prior to starting and they were correct. Is it possible that the original bike had the rear wheel offset to the non-drive side? Buchanan states that the distance from the brake drum mount surface to the rim center should be 2". This would leave the rim offset to the non-drive side a good bit. If the rear wheel did come out of the factory offset, is the front wheel centered between the fork tubes or offset to be inline with the rear? Wouldn't this adversely affect handling? Why is this such a pain in the ass?

Thanks in advance for the advice.

Chris
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Old 08-07-2014, 10:32 PM   #2
kllrjo
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Default Re: 1968 TR6C wheel building

nearly every Triumph i`v seen with a rear tyre larger than 4.00 had chain scrub marks on it! certainly makes me wonder if there is a significant offset to the non-drive side!

"If the rear wheel did come out of the factory offset, is the front wheel centered between the fork tubes or offset to be inline with the rear? Wouldn't this adversely affect handling?"
I`v seen bikes so far out of line that they wore tyres at a significant rate! and yet their owners would not believe that this was true until they followed the bike, and then they were amazed! they swore that the bike rode fine! it takes a LOT of offset before you realize it from a handlebar point-of-veiw!
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Old 08-07-2014, 10:34 PM   #3
Tony the torch
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Default Re: 1968 TR6C wheel building

now know why we just take our wheels right to Buchanan's, and let them lace them up.
it takes us about an hour to get there and it well worth the drive.
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Old 08-08-2014, 10:15 AM   #4
Samhain
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Default Re: 1968 TR6C wheel building

is the wheel offset from the hub or offset from proper alignment? The distance from the sprocket to the center of rim needs to match the drive alignment.
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Old 08-08-2014, 04:50 PM   #5
Mr.Pete
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Default Re: 1968 TR6C wheel building

The front rim should be dead centre between the fork legs.
Whenever I do a rear wheel, I adjust it so the distance between the sprocket centreline and rim centreline is 2-15/16". Using any other measurement will only get you approximately there.

At that measurement, you can have the sprockets aligned and the rear rim/tyre will be 1/16" away from frame centre (toward the primary side). That's where you want it, if you have a unit engine. A unit engine is noticeably heavier on the primary side, and the bike will steer straight at that even when you release the handlebar.
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Old 08-09-2014, 10:29 PM   #6
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Default Re: 1968 TR6C wheel building

Thanks for the help. It appears as if the stock swingarm was offset to the drive side to minimize dish in the wheel. The aftermarket hardtail is centered on the frame and that is where the problem lies. Talked to Buchanan (very helpful), and they stated the centerline of the rear rim should be two inches from the drum mount surface. I'll start there and see how far off center I am. Guess I need to make sure the driveline is parallel and co-linear as well...
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