The Jockey Journal Board

The Jockey Journal Board (https://www.jockeyjournal.com/forum/index.php)
-   The Board (https://www.jockeyjournal.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=2)
-   -   deformed bolt head (https://www.jockeyjournal.com/forum/showthread.php?t=91519)

michaelbarry 10-14-2011 11:48 PM

Re: deformed bolt head
 

What gapwelder said. That method + heating beforehand has always worked good for me.

govmule84 10-15-2011 12:29 AM

Re: deformed bolt head
 

I've had great luck with brake fluid as a penetrant.

And when you can, soak shit in water. Drop the whole mess in. I read about a gunsmith who used to do this, and figured he was retarded - until I tried it.

I think I would also try to grind two flats opposite each other to give either a wrench or a set of Vise-Grips something meaty to bite onto.

And I really love that welding idea - that one's gotten me out of a few pickles.

cashbur 10-15-2011 12:33 AM

Re: deformed bolt head
 

Cut the head off and drill it out.

CarlLaFong 10-15-2011 12:51 AM

Re: deformed bolt head
 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Loffer (Post 770891)
or go buy a ten dollar roll of flux core mig wire

What's he supposed to do? Hold the end of the wire next to the kicker?

Dan Boy 10-15-2011 05:50 AM

Re: deformed bolt head
 

Quote:

Originally Posted by CarlLaFong (Post 770960)
What's he supposed to do? Hold the end of the wire next to the kicker?

No, take it to his mate who has a gas-less mig!

Dan Boy 10-15-2011 05:53 AM

Re: deformed bolt head
 

I have this week had 2 bolts that the head was screwed on. I drilled the head off the bolt to get the cover off and then found that the bolt was then finger loose in the thread so I just wound it out with my fingers.

Your lesson here is don't start a job you don't have the tools to finish. If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

Cheers Dan.

Dan Boy 10-15-2011 07:17 AM

Re: deformed bolt head
 

Oh yeh, if you are going to drill the head off the bolt remember to centre punch it first, if you've not got one, go borrow one before you make a bad situation worse.

Remember the 6 P's analogy...

Cheers Dan.

old.wrench 10-15-2011 01:41 PM

Re: deformed bolt head
 

The kydd said he's trying to remove the bolt that holds the kicker pedal on. That bolt threads down into the kicker arm, so there ain't goin' to be any cutting off the head and driving it out. I would remove the kicker arm and clamp it in a vice so its held securely and you can work on it efficiently. Its going to take some heat and penetrant to loosen it, probably several cycles of heating and cooling to break the little mother free. Put the heat where it'll do some good, down where the threads are. You don't have to heat it up red hot, but you do need to get it hot. Start out at a lower heat maybe 500-600 degrees(use your imagination, I'm sure you don't have an infra-red temp gun!!!), so you can save your chrome on the kick arm. You can always increase the heat later. Make sure you let it cool down to room temp between cycles (don't cool it with water!). You want to use plenty of penetrant (the best stuff I ever used was a mixture of ATF and acetone but there are plenty of them on the market). Another thing that works is the old blacksmith trick, bees wax. Heat up the frozen connection and then take some bees wax and apply it to stubborn bolt or stud. The heat will melt the wax and pull it down into the frozen threads. Frozen threads are something you have to be patient with. You have to outwit them, rather than beat them into submission with brute strength :D.

Regards,
Geo.

that_stupid_kydd 10-15-2011 03:55 PM

Re: deformed bolt head
 

Quote:

Originally Posted by old.wrench (Post 771035)
The kydd said he's trying to remove the bolt that holds the kicker pedal on. That bolt threads down into the kicker arm, so there ain't goin' to be any cutting off the head and driving it out. I would remove the kicker arm and clamp it in a vice so its held securely and you can work on it efficiently. Its going to take some heat and penetrant to loosen it, probably several cycles of heating and cooling to break the little mother free. Put the heat where it'll do some good, down where the threads are. You don't have to heat it up red hot, but you do need to get it hot. Start out at a lower heat maybe 500-600 degrees(use your imagination, I'm sure you don't have an infra-red temp gun!!!), so you can save your chrome on the kick arm. You can always increase the heat later. Make sure you let it cool down to room temp between cycles (don't cool it with water!). You want to use plenty of penetrant (the best stuff I ever used was a mixture of ATF and acetone but there are plenty of them on the market). Another thing that works is the old blacksmith trick, bees wax. Heat up the frozen connection and then take some bees wax and apply it to stubborn bolt or stud. The heat will melt the wax and pull it down into the frozen threads. Frozen threads are something you have to be patient with. You have to outwit them, rather than beat them into submission with brute strength :D.

Regards,
Geo.

i've got it in the vice, so i'm gonna hit in with heat(propane plumbing torch) and oil for a few days then try the chisel trick and if that doesn't work i'll go out and get some good quality easy outs (snap-on, matco,etc)

gapwelder 10-15-2011 04:37 PM

Re: deformed bolt head
 

I think that is a good plan given your resources. I don't know if has been mentioned but if you have access to the bottom of the bolt, it would help to drill a hole in the center of the threads. This will give the metal room to expand/contract during the heat/ cool cycle. Don't drill all the way through the bolt, just the length of the threads. The chisel method takes a bit of finesse. Too steep of an angle and you will just peel out the metal. Too shallow and the bolt won't turn when you hit the chisel. You don't want an overly sharp chisel, just sharp enough to bite. Don't be aggressive with the hammer. Just some sharp, solid strikes. Be sure to wear eye protection. Good Luck.

gw

flatman 10-15-2011 04:54 PM

Re: deformed bolt head
 

Don't you have a local cycle shop or a welding shop you could take it to to weld a nut (arc or mig) on the bolt and unscrew it for you? Should be between free, six pack, or less then 10 bucks. Would be cheaper than easy outs, but if you buy the easy outs instead you will have them next time? IMHO

chassy55 10-15-2011 09:51 PM

Re: deformed bolt head
 

Whackin' that bolt head with a hammer sometimes helps also. The vise can mark the lever up if you don't put something soft in there to clamp on, like blocks of wood or aluminum.

ob1quixote 10-15-2011 10:03 PM

Re: deformed bolt head
 

Put a little anti-seize on the new bolt...

57rigid 10-16-2011 02:56 AM

Re: deformed bolt head
 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Unkl Ian (Post 770792)
Weld a nut on the bolt.

this works for me quite often, sometimes if the remainder of the bolt is short you can weld a thick washer on first and then a nut on top of that, it also seems to me that the heat from welding will help loosen the bolt up

Dan Boy 10-16-2011 03:47 AM

Re: deformed bolt head
 

Quote:

Originally Posted by flatman (Post 771076)
Don't you have a local cycle shop or a welding shop you could take it to to weld a nut (arc or mig) on the bolt and unscrew it for you? Should be between free, six pack, or less then 10 bucks. Would be cheaper than easy outs, but if you buy the easy outs instead you will have them next time? IMHO

I think you should seriously consider this option before you buy anything. Consider where you will be if you bought some stud extractors (easy outs) and still couldn't get the bolt out.

A shop will have stud extractors, a welder, some heat, a guy who has done this many times before. Its a good and cheap option on limited funds.

Cheers Dan.

spununit 10-16-2011 04:17 AM

Re: deformed bolt head
 

Sounds like you need to go the heating or welding route. Someone said soak in brake fluid beware that if do, don't go near it with a gas torch as brake fluid is highly flammable especially important if it's attached to the bike.

Stinky Pete 10-16-2011 09:40 AM

Re: deformed bolt head
 

Quote:

Originally Posted by gapwelder (Post 771068)
I think that is a good plan given your resources. I don't know if has been mentioned but if you have access to the bottom of the bolt, it would help to drill a hole in the center of the threads.

Good point - I actually had some little bolts stuck fast in a headlight bucket. They we're philips head someone worked over pretty bad. I drilled a little hole in the head, in the center of the cross. The seemed to relieve enough pressure that I could take them out with channel locks.

alaskanrocket 10-16-2011 01:31 PM

Re: deformed bolt head
 

Wow, all this for a stuck bolt. Man, I've been gone for too long.

old.wrench 10-16-2011 02:06 PM

Re: deformed bolt head
 

Hang in there kydd. I've had the same problem with the same kicker pedal bolt. Let the penetrant and the heating and cooling cycles do their work. If the finish on the kick arm isn't of prime importance, you can increase the heat and speed the process up, but in the end you're still going to have to get a good grip on whatever is left of the bolt head. Welding a nut onto whatever is left of the bolt head is definitly the preferred method. You can weld it right through the hole in nut, let it cool, and then crank the offender out of there. Chase the threads with the appropiate tap, a new bolt with a little anti-sieze, a new lock washer, and you're good. If you can't find somebody to weld the nut for you, you might be able to carefully grind the bolt head enough to get a really GOOD grip with a pair of GOOD vise-grips. The cheesy ones that have slop and twist aren't worth a damn. Good Luck, and let us know how you make out.

Regards,
Geo.

Goldy 10-16-2011 04:53 PM

Re: deformed bolt head
 

Hard to believe that a thread on a stuck bolt could get this long :) Anyhow Kydd, Easyouts bust pretty easy too, be careful or this might turn into a thread on how to remove broken extractors :D
Have patience...Best of luck, I'm sure you'll get it!


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:46 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.