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ca180 11-22-2007 08:52 PM

Home made workshop tools
 

Just wanted to see what kind of home made tools and stuff you guys have... I've already heard of a few.

On guy said a washing machine motor for a buffer.

Also seen a drill in a vice and a grinder become a lathe.

What else ya'll got?

nfms39 11-22-2007 11:18 PM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

i'd like to hear what guys use instead of to get the job done... i think this would be a good thread...

Neo Dutch 11-22-2007 11:27 PM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

Buffer stand. Also holds elecky motor with a wire wheel on it. Buff comes off and a bar bender can bolt to the top. Base is a Leopard tank road wheel.

http://www.pinheadlounge.com/photos/..._Weekend02.jpg

ca180 11-23-2007 12:17 PM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

I used to have a bench grinder stand made out of an extra wheel and a used driveshaft. Worked like a charm, but would vibrate half way across the room if you didnt keep your foot on it.

All this has me wondering if I could make a decent small scale lathe out of my drill press.

Keep em coming, good ideas I don't think I've thought of! Its amazing how you realize you need something when someone shows what they've got.

machobuck 11-23-2007 04:59 PM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

http://i14.photobucket.com/albums/a3...ture1362-1.jpg

chopaweeza 11-25-2007 03:24 AM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

Tubing Bender. Design by Blackjack. Adapted to take a locally produced hatchback hub. I've built several frames with it so far and recommend it highly

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a1...za/GetBent.jpg

Easy enough to use that even Neo Dutch had a go.

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a1...tchBending.jpg

Ea$y 11-25-2007 02:42 PM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

Quote:

Originally Posted by chopaweeza (Post 239932)
Tubing Bender. Design by Blackjack. Adapted to take a locally produced hatchback hub. I've built several frames with it so far and recommend it highly

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a1...za/GetBent.jpg

This is RAD!! Im sooo gonna copy that!Hope ya dont mind.
Awesome tech thread!

ca180 11-25-2007 04:13 PM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

So what Hatch back hub do you use with that?

concrete guy 11-25-2007 04:49 PM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

1 Attachment(s)
Here's a tubing notcher that I made got it from some guy off the net. It works well.

chopaweeza 11-25-2007 05:18 PM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

It works very well and will replicate bends easily. I use a high tech method to replicate bends. I mark the hub with a piece of chalk and then bend the next piece to were the chalk mark is. I used a Holden Barina hub which is common as muck here , Blackjack used a Ford Fiesta and I've heard some guys in the USA use Rabbit or Jack Rabbit(memories not so good) hub as well. It's a very flexible design that has at least 12 variants that I know of . It's Low Tech but it works. Here's where to find it.

http://www.thefont.pwp.blueyonder.co...ube_bender.htm

RAZ 11-25-2007 07:26 PM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

This is what I made to put louvers in exhaust tube for making baffels
I use the angle aluminium to shim for different diameter tubing.
http://i229.photobucket.com/albums/e...3/42900021.jpg
http://i229.photobucket.com/albums/e...3/42900020.jpg

flattracklarry 11-25-2007 09:17 PM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

Quote:

Originally Posted by chopaweeza (Post 239933)
Tubing Bender. Design by Blackjack. Adapted to take a locally produced hatchback hub. I've built several frames with it so far and recommend it highly



Easy enough to use that even Neo Dutch had a go.

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a1...tchBending.jpg


Sorry man, but ^that^ thing looks like a quick trip to the ER.:eek:

ca180 11-25-2007 11:21 PM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

Quote:

Originally Posted by flattracklarry (Post 240198)
Sorry man, but ^that^ thing looks like a quick trip to the ER.:eek:

+1

If I build that I'm going to try to intigrate a hydraulic jack.... I really dont wanna bust my ass.

Rob Axel 11-25-2007 11:24 PM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

Adding a "strap" wouldn't be a bad Idea to keep that from exploading if it slips off.

Bad Liver 11-26-2007 08:07 AM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

There was a thread about engine turning finishes recently. You can glue some sandpaper to the bottom of a valve and stick that in your drill to use for engine turning. Bigger valve, bigger pattern.

scootermcrad 11-26-2007 09:48 AM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

Great thread! I think this was started once before but didn't get even close to being this big.

I've got a thingamajig I made for engine turning. I'll try and get a picture of it.

BTTT

F.St.M. 11-27-2007 05:46 PM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

I got a homemade wheel truing stand:

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n...e/HPIM1498.jpg

I got a homemade clutch hub puller:

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n...e/HPIM1500.jpg

And last but not least, I got a homemade phase converter so I can run my 3-phase mill & lathe off of residential 220 juice:

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n...e/HPIM1492.jpg

ca180 11-27-2007 06:39 PM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

On the topic of that pipe bender... I was thinking that a come-along strapped to it would probably make the bending easier. Maybe safer, unless the cable breaks.

Love where this is going!

Gotta see more stuff. I'm just a broke white boy, cant afford lathes and pipe benders and all that shit.

#1. 11-27-2007 06:57 PM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

Oil furnace broke.
Replaced with gas furnace.
Needed a use for old furnace fan.

This thing blows the smoke out of the garage when I am welding or when I set something on fire.

<object width="425" height="355"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/z0_z4GWGdDc&rel=1"></param><param name="wmode" value="transparent"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/z0_z4GWGdDc&rel=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" wmode="transparent" width="425" height="355"></embed></object>

scootermcrad 11-27-2007 07:45 PM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

Quote:

Originally Posted by #1. (Post 240979)
Oil furnace broke.
Replaced with gas furnace.
Needed a use for old furnace fan.

This thing blows the smoke out of the garage when I am welding or when I set something on fire.


<OBJECT height=355 width=425>

<embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/z0_z4GWGdDc&rel=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" wmode="transparent" width="425" height="355"></embed></OBJECT>

</P>That thing rules! So does the sign to the left of it!! :eek:

RAZ 11-27-2007 11:12 PM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

F.st.m. can you give us some more detail on the phase converter?
http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n...e/HPIM1492.jpg

F.St.M. 11-28-2007 09:15 AM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

Sure Raz,

First single phase (2 hot legs) enters the knife switch box at the bottom of the box. Leg #2 is jumped(split) to power up what will become the third leg. Time-delay fuses are installed so that the breaker doesn't trip during initial start-up.

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n...e/HPIM1502.jpg

Then the third leg power is sent down to a start capacitor. It returns up and into the momentary (light switch) switch. It then goes down and "bump starts" the idler motor which is bolted to the side of my mill.

With zero load on the idler motor, it creates a steady third leg (L3) which can now be used by the mill & lathe.

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n...e/HPIM1505.jpg

Though still a bit messy, the circuits can be identified on the wall board in this last photo. When running only one machine, the circuits (L1, L2, & l3) are very well ballanced and the "created 3rd leg" is at 92% - 96% amperage which is just about perfect. When running both(mill & lathe) machines simultaneously, amperage on L3 drops to 88% so I just plug in to the dayton run cap (blue star in photo) and this brings it back up to 95%.

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n...e/HPIM1507.jpg

Total expenses were $80 this includes the idler motor(ebay), fuses, romex, capacitors, and light switch. The knife switch came with the mill when I got it, so that was a freebie.

Jeff L 11-28-2007 10:15 AM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

I converted a 9" benchtop drill press into a makeshift vertical lathe for polishing aluminum tubing.A live center on the bottom & a bow roller off a boat trailer that I cut in half & reshaped on the top.

scootermcrad 11-28-2007 12:34 PM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jeff L (Post 241197)
I converted a 9" benchtop drill press into a makeshift vertical lathe for polishing aluminum tubing.A live center on the bottom & a bow roller off a boat trailer that I cut in half & reshaped on the top.

OH HEY!! That's a great idea!!!

1fastfx 11-28-2007 09:23 PM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

Quote:

Originally Posted by F.St.M. (Post 241179)
Sure Raz,

First single phase (2 hot legs) enters the knife switch box at the bottom of the box. Leg #2 is jumped(split) to power up what will become the third leg. Time-delay fuses are installed so that the breaker doesn't trip during initial start-up.

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n...e/HPIM1502.jpg

Then the third leg power is sent down to a start capacitor. It returns up and into the momentary (light switch) switch. It then goes down and "bump starts" the idler motor which is bolted to the side of my mill.

With zero load on the idler motor, it creates a steady third leg (L3) which can now be used by the mill & lathe.

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n...e/HPIM1505.jpg

Though still a bit messy, the circuits can be identified on the wall board in this last photo. When running only one machine, the circuits (L1, L2, & l3) are very well ballanced and the "created 3rd leg" is at 92&#37; - 96% amperage which is just about perfect. When running both(mill & lathe) machines simultaneously, amperage on L3 drops to 88% so I just plug in to the dayton run cap (blue star in photo) and this brings it back up to 95%.

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n...e/HPIM1507.jpg

Total expenses were $80 this includes the idler motor(ebay), fuses, romex, capacitors, and light switch. The knife switch came with the mill when I got it, so that was a freebie.

I have heard of this done before but nobody explained it as well as you have.Nice job ,esp when multible applications are needed.I have printed this and put in my notes for future reference.....Thanks

VA Rebel 11-28-2007 10:10 PM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

F.St.M.

I applaud your make do creativity, but your electrical installation is a disaster.

Get an enclosure for those live parts before someone gets zapped. Those lugs are an electrocution hazzard, especially with either motor under load.

Pearson Customs 11-29-2007 12:07 AM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

1 Attachment(s)
Here is my home made mill, back in trade school each of us made parts and then we all put them together and we each had a mill.
Chad
www.pearsoncustoms.com

kbg 11-29-2007 12:31 AM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

wheeling machines, got plans off internet, made two one paid for
mine.
http://i182.photobucket.com/albums/x...ns/WHEELER.jpg

Dan 11-29-2007 09:59 AM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

a stand for holding stuff, the arms adjust vert. and horizontaly

http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c8...intpics002.jpg


neck fixture for an as yet unfinished frame jig


http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c8...ramejig001.jpg


probably too dark to see but a combo wheel chock / tie down

http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c8...masbday026.jpg


over center bike lift

http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c8...ikelift002.jpg

some mods to a HF tubing notcherhttp://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c8...ikelift001.jpg

kids in shop class using a T-dolly
http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c8...opclass006.jpg

this table has been one of the most useful things ever, has casters and makes moving things around the shop super easy, a '26 roadster is sitting on it now and I just push it around the shop
http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c8...ter2006022.jpg

homemade Les Paul :)
http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c80/Danjc/lp2.jpg

Dan 11-30-2007 09:01 AM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

The thing was actually pretty decent for a HF tool right out of the box. The only things I did were mount it to a good heavy base (I built a wood one first but the 1/4" steel plate is much better). The biggest problem I found is that the pipe clamp didnt quite line up with quill, hole would be drilled off center. All I had to do was put some shim stock between the pipe clamp (the black piece) and the frame (the gray piece) to line it up. I think the biggest secret to making it work is good hole saws.

ca180 12-15-2007 10:43 PM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

2 Attachment(s)
Just found this online... Guy says its for forming tunnels for bike gas tanks.

caschnd1 12-15-2007 10:53 PM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

I use this tool to pressure test my intake manifold. Super easy to find even the smallest leaks.

http://i208.photobucket.com/albums/b...1/DCP_3310.jpg

http://i208.photobucket.com/albums/b...1/DCP_3311.jpg
  1. Remove the carb
  2. Bolt this onto the end of the intake using the rubber inner tube "gasket" to seal it up.
  3. Put my air compressor hose on the nipple and adjust the regulator to 10psi.
  4. Spray all around the intake o-rings with water with a little bit of dish soap.
If you have a leak, you'll get lots of bubbles. Much more reliable way to find intake leaks then spraying around the intake with WD40 or carb cleaner.

-Craig

ca180 12-15-2007 11:03 PM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

Good Idea, I need to make one of those

Concrete B 09-25-2008 09:10 AM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

I've been in the mood to make some items for the garage. I'll get pics of my metal brakes, english wheel, and parts washer and post them up. In the mean time....bump.

JeffO 09-26-2008 01:10 AM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

great scott 1.21 jigawatts
Quote:

Originally Posted by RAZ (Post 241090)
F.st.m. can you give us some more detail on the phase converter?
http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n...e/HPIM1492.jpg


F.St.M. 09-26-2008 07:50 AM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

Quote:

Originally Posted by VA Rebel (Post 241469)
F.St.M.

I applaud your make do creativity, but your electrical installation is a disaster.

Get an enclosure for those live parts before someone gets zapped. Those lugs are an electrocution hazzard, especially with either motor under load.

I usualy try to avoid licking the live lugs on the wall when I'm machining something, so enclosing them is not a concern.

Brass Brawler 09-26-2008 08:26 AM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

Quote:

Originally Posted by JeffO (Post 396014)
great scott 1.21 jigawatts

It still amazes me that "Doc" Brown could build a time machine, but lack the necessary skills to pronounce gigawatt....

Markee 09-26-2008 10:52 AM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

When you build time machines at 60 years old, who has the time to learn spelling and pronunciations.

Bumpstick 09-26-2008 12:18 PM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

My "poorman's" wheel clamp. I know, I need to turn the heat up on my welder. Hahaha...

http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c9...ick/CHOCK1.jpg

http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c9...ick/CHOCK2.jpg

The tried and true 'block of wood' but with channels drilled for a lil' added stability. Clamp a 2x4 to a 6x4 use a 1-3/8" bit at the seam and you get a perfect channel for the frame. 'b'

http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c9...ick/block1.jpg

buckman50 09-26-2008 03:11 PM

Re: Home made workshop tools
 

Quote:

Originally Posted by JeffO (Post 396014)
great scott 1.21 jigawatts

Im convinced Doc Brown...errr Fritz...has plans for the flux capacitor buried somewhere in his shop.


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