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Old 10-22-2010, 06:52 PM   #1
thegreasepit
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Default Project: NorField

I've had several requests to do a build thread on this bike, but this project is pretty much finished after a year and a half of bustin' my ass during my lunch breaks and long nights on the weekend, it's running and been slowly breaking the motor in when I have the time.
Quick history on this build:
This is a super budget build in the $5-6k range which I only happened to go over about $500 bucks. Not bad. A local old machinist has a small horde of brit bikes in Indio, CA (yeah, Indio of all places) and met him while working for Mitch Bergeron. I finally talked him down to $600 after 4 months of negotiating.

This was my first time ground up build, cutting my teeth learning TIG and machining. Lots of trial and error, or trial and FUCK THIS, I'm not looking at this damn thing for a week.

What the basket case looked like picking it up.





Mitch demanding a pose on the newly acquired project.




Quickly stripping the bike down to asses the amount of work ahead of me. I was WAY off.




First order of business was tearing the engine down, and getting it cleaned and rebuilt with fresh internals.




Standard size bore that had been rebuilt , then probably stuffed away in the corner where I found it. Everything looked pretty good. I tore the crank down to find the sludge-trap clean as a whistle.




After a case of carb/brake cleaner and a scrub brush... and a massive chemical high, I saw the light, then blacked out.




Got the heads (and cylinders) looking from shit to shiny with a quick blast in the booth and lots of elbow grease hand polishing the heads.











After that was finished, I got the cylinders bored and honed, then set the ring gap. Then shot them with 4 coats of hi-temp gloss black.





Every single thing on that bike needed a good clean and polish. The timing cover was cracked and got that welded, sanded, then polished. Some before/ after pics, all done the hard way, by hand. Wish I had a decent bench polisher handy.















I have a feeling this will take me a while to post all the pics and procedure, so I'll do it in steps over a couple days.

Leavin' work so I'll continue this tomorrow.
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Old 10-22-2010, 08:56 PM   #2
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Default Re: Project: NorField

motor looks tough. anxiously awaiting updates.
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Old 10-24-2010, 02:12 PM   #3
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Default Re: Project: NorField

Quote:
Originally Posted by hatchethairy View Post
motor looks tough. anxiously awaiting updates.
Here ya go.


I originally wanted to run the stock 376 Amal carb that came with the bike, since it would save some cash and be more period correct, but I found a damn good deal on a set of 930 carbs and couldn't pass 'em up. I've wanted to keep this thing late 50's early 60's period correct, but I also wanted this bike to be quick. Knowing RE's aren't widely known for their speed, this bike needed some serious upgrades starting with the carburetors.
Before finding the 930's, I got the original carb cleaned up after years of collecting dust.




I let this bastard sit in carb cleaner for about 3 days and then gave it a good cleaning.







I still have this carb sitting in a box and not sure what to do with it.
Here was my next project that took months of cleaning and tracking down parts - most was from Hitchcock's Motorcycles in England. All was well except for the thing wouldn't fire. All it took was a good re-magnetization done by Wes at Four Aces.

A 'before' pic



Everything was stripped off this. Looked like the previous owner was stuck with this as the last thing to get the bike running (the engine had a fresh rebuild) but was stuck finding parts. Hitchcock's has a vast supply of original Lucas parts including points and cover. It was pretty rad seeing all this vintage stuff come in the mail.




Turned out pretty sweet. I had to use some #10 machine screws to keep the cover on and 1/4" set screws to keep the coil in, but it works fine.







I should get back to the engine assembly and modifications.


Like I said before, REs aren't known for their speed...with the exception with the Constellation, which boasted a top speed of 105+mph back in '58. Anyway, I knew to make good power is with good cams and good carbs. I started with getting a fresh +40 bore with new pistons and along with new cams. The Constellation had bigger cams than the Super Meteor, but I came across MegaCycle as an alternative.

I sent them my original cams to be welded and re-ground and was suggested to contact R/D for some good valve springs. After getting my cams back, I sent R/D the spec sheet and got a set of hi-po springs about 2 weeks later.

I really wanted race-spec cams. I got them.








After nearly shitting myself out of excitement, I decided to use the upcoming Saturday to put the bottom end and cases together.

Saturday came around and ran into a BIG PROBLEM....the cam lobes were too big to fit inside the case!!! Holy Fuck this bike's gonna scream, I was thinking to myself as I used a carbide bit to enlarge the cam openings in the case. After 3 hours and lots of cleaning, the cams finally fit and the case was sealed together.

Here's to trying to set the timing, which is a major pain in the dick. I hate it, but it's one step closer to running time.



I wanted this motor to breathe well so I did some modifications here and there.



more continued in a minute.
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Old 10-24-2010, 03:12 PM   #4
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Default Re: Project: NorField

During my engine build and waiting for parts, I got working on the frame. There were several options: buying a real Norton featherbed, buying an aftermarket featherbed, or making my own. Being on a budget, spending 500-2000 on a frame was out of the question. I had experience modifying frames, but never built one from scratch. Since I could not find blueprints or dimensions of a featherbed, I utilized google and printed tons of pictures and settled on making a slimline as I heard the widelines were less comfortable to ride on.

I made a frame jig using the stock Enfield frame and set the neck, swing arm, and engine mounts.






I brought Mitch a bunch of pictures, as he has 15 years of frame building under his belt, but though I was fucking crazy to make this type of frame. He kept telling me to 'just buy a frame' because making one would be a PITA. He was right.
My obsession with building this bike was all about weight - the lighter the bike, the faster it goes. He suggested using chromoly and special ordered two 12' lengths of 1.25x.90 tubing. This fucker will be LIGHT just how I wanted.

The original triple trees off the Super Meteor was out of the question as they used screw in fork tubes and I wanted trees with pinch bolts to use any 35mm front end that I wanted. I found a set of aluminum triple trees from an Ossa and had a neck machined by the gent I bought the bike from.




Yeah, I'm this guy.





The coolest thing about getting custom parts machined is handing the machinist a slip of paper and getting a part in-hand a couple days later














There is a Kaman Bearings store two doors down from the machinist. All I needed was to pick up the part, and walk down to the bearing place.


Now the fun (actually, the hard part) begins.





Brought to you by a cheap, but decent beer.



The 'T' section behind the transmission locates the swing-arm plates which is approximately stock location.
This frame took so much trial and error getting the tube bends to line up, making sure the engine is square, and trying to keep the right dimensions using only pictures of frames/complete motorcycles I printed off google.





This could easily have been left a 'wideline' frame with adding the two loops and calling it a day, but that would have been too easy - I'm a glutton for punishment... I needed a slimline.






Templates were made from heavy paperboard and transferred to 1/4" chromoly plates (Mitch had leftover scrap from some custom experimental aircraft parts he made - lucky me).






Plasma cutters kick ass.























The original swing arm.





I made the mistake of setting the neck too high and had the top tube curve up to meet the neck. I noticed my error after buying a FG Manx 'sprint' tank and have it not fit.






The light sanded area on the right loop in the center, and on the left loop below the main, rear bend is where I needed to sleeve the frame when the tubes were a little off or didn't line up right. PITA frame.




More on the next post.
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Old 10-24-2010, 03:47 PM   #5
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Default Re: Project: NorField

Guess I'm limited to 20 pics a post...





All I really had left was to make the rear loops for the shocks. Some Norton frames has the loop that holds the fender with straight supports, but I like the two loops better.

Here's me thinking this bike would be wayyyy to tiny for me to ride. I'm 6' 2' and this frame feels like it should have pedals.





The picture sitting on the frame with pretty much all I had to work with. What I'd give for some simple dimensions...





Shock mounts were the last thing I fabbed for this bike, and being slightly intimidated that I would fuck something up, I procrastinated. To tell you the truth, it was pretty damn easy. More templates, plasma cutting, and hammer-with-vice bending, and a bit of welding was all it took.




The left upper shock mount had to be moved 1/4" outside as the shocks interfered with the chain/sprocket. The two tabs under the main loops hold the mufflers in place and the short tubes on the shock loops hold the seat in place. The seat has two short tubes on that. When the seat is lowered on the frame, the tubes line up and a pin slides through the tubes. It works, but I wish I made something easier.




Now on to the transmission mounts.











Not sure why I completely forgot to re-use the stock transmission mounts as I want to kick my own ass for doing so. These mounts work fine.






A Manx seat I picked up from Clubman Racing. These guys are cool and a breeze to deal with. Surprisingly, the seat fit the frame perfectly. Shit, what a stressful time thinking nothing was gonna fit right.






Some aluminum intake manifolds I fabbed up and used that opportunity to learn aluminum with the TIG. Mitch wasn't much help, he just watched me till I screwed something up. Tough love.











A year and some change after picking up the basket case, the engine was finally finished.




Only after getting the bike running, I realized what a stupid idea tilting the carbs up was, spending hours getting the floats to not flood or lean out. It looks cool though.





After my engine was done, I had a short list of thing left to finish. Wheels and brakes were next on my list.

After two months debating wheel/tire size, Mitch flipped a coin deciding between 18/18" or 19/19"s. I bought 18"s. Buchanan provided me with some shouldered Excel rims and stainless spokes after draining my wallet. Definitely worth the purchase, but I can be a real cheap ass sometimes and cringe remembering how much building a bike actually costs.





Knowing this bike will like seriously go, like, way fucking fast, reliable braking (while maintaining my budget) was paramount. The best alternative to a real Manx or Fontanta/ Grimeca 4LS was the Suzuki 750 hub. Found this gem on eBay for about $300 and spent another $60 getting the controls and brake cables. I got the hub laced and trued in record time!






Working on the rear hub was the real pain. Had a massive fit after Buchanan took weeks to get the spokes back and sending ones that were too long, even after 5+ phone calls confirming hub dimensions. After having them trim down the spokes, the wheel laced together in about 15 minutes.

The rear hub:




To





After tons of polishing and crap, both wheels with tires. God damn that's secksee.





More updates tomorrow.
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Old 10-24-2010, 04:01 PM   #6
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Default Re: Project: NorField

What a great thread.

Now I have to wait til tomorrow...
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Old 10-24-2010, 04:40 PM   #7
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What a great thread.

Now I have to wait til tomorrow...
Agreed. More please!
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Old 10-24-2010, 05:02 PM   #8
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Default Re: Project: NorField

Homebuilt Featherbed. Nice.
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Old 10-24-2010, 05:55 PM   #9
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lovely work , keep it up .
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Old 10-24-2010, 06:21 PM   #10
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Default Re: Project: NorField

You should've left the Indian badges on it. It would really fuck people up.
Paint it red with a huge Indian script on the tank.
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Old 10-24-2010, 06:29 PM   #11
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Homebuilt Featherbed. Nice.
Agreed. Every time I see someone doing this it makes me want to learn to bend tube and TIG weld. I really like the OIF frames, but nothing says awesome like the featherbed frame. Home built to boot. Nice man. Nice!
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Old 10-24-2010, 06:31 PM   #12
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Default Re: Project: NorField

I'm convinced you're a maniac.


That's not a bad thing.
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Old 10-25-2010, 08:17 AM   #13
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Default Re: Project: NorField

I'm glad you're writing this up. That's a really nice build there. I'm rockin' the Indian badges on mine though.

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Old 10-25-2010, 03:20 PM   #14
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Default Re: Project: NorField

You guys are great. I really appreciate the comments. I did have the original Indian badge, but Mitch begged me for him to keep it... so I taped it to the timing cover of his EVO. I've been waiting two weeks to hear back from the REOC of England to tell me what the hell I own - year and exact model (assuming it's a Trailblazer going off the tiny cams and lower compression motor) but they haven't been shit for help yet.

After getting most of the frame finished, I needed a tank. I've always wanted an aluminum Manx tank, but I was really budgeted on money and time. I had no experience making a tank from scratch and would rather not have this project be my first one, so I searched eBay for a while and scored a 'sprint' Manx tank for $250. Surprising to me, it fit...well, except for the front of the frame that meets the neck. The bottom of the tank needed cut outs and I spent a couple days laying down fiberglass. It took about 3 months to track down every little leak and get those fixed.

Some mock up shots:







I took a sheet of aluminum and welded some strips together to make a tank strap. Keeping with the racer mentality, this tank had to come off quick if needed, so I visited the local Ace hardware and found some brass clasps for a couple bucks.




The opposite end of the strap has a pin which makes the strap completely removable in seconds.





Now on to painting the tank. I spent a week sanding the gel-coat, laying 3 layers of primer, sanding that, and sprayed 4 coats of Rustoleum Professional Aluminum paint, that damn near looks like aluminum.

Here's what it looked like (I'll tell you more about the exhaust later on) before it got fucked up. Yeah, the paint was drying outside on a stand when some dickless piece of shit pulls up to pick up some bike parts I finished. He gets in with his buddy and some ditsy chick and KNOCKS THE TANK OFF THE STAND completely ruining my fresh paint. "OH BRO, SO SORRY. DAMN BRO. SHIT." He gave me about $32 and I told him to piss up a rope. The paint still is fucked but I'll paint it when I have some time.






After that incident passed, I still needed some forks. Once again, I jumped on ebay and found some complete forks off an early-mid 70's Honda XL 350 for $35 bucks. I spent another $15 on fork seals and oil. Not bad condition either!


I had to heavily modify the axle to fit with the hub and fork tubes (took weeks!) and completed the braking with some aluminum brackets.





This bike wouldn't go anywhere unless I had some bars. Once again, eBay to the rescue with a set of clip-ons from Canada for $50 and a twin Amal throttle lever for about $12. Seriously some great deals on there if you know where to look!




And the steering stop after adjusting the bars to fit without hitting the tank.





I found this tach from Westach after contacting several british suppliers that could sell me something to work with my magneto. I was suggested to contact these guys and made this just for my specs. They stopped making this style for mags and didn't have anything higher than 4k. Took two weeks and cost about $150. I made the bracket from 1/4 aluminum plate, a hole saw and messaging with a grinder.





I'll stop here since my lunch break is over and I gotta search my computer for more pictures.

It's good hearing feedback from you guys after getting burned out with this thing for a while.
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Old 10-25-2010, 05:55 PM   #15
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Default Re: Project: NorField

This bike is coming along nicely. I'm diggin it. Just goes to show you what you can do with a budget and some determination.
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Old 10-25-2010, 06:54 PM   #16
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Alright, where was I...

Guess I'll give some information on the exhaust. I bought a pair of pipes for a Triumph from a fellow JJer, but keeping my fingers crossed hoping they would fit just didn't work out. The pipes interfered with the rear sets so I set those aside as decided to make the pipes myself.

I found this picture looking for Tritons and Norton road racing bikes and the high-pipes stuck with me. I knew those were custom, so I tried going a different route...no dice.




I had a set of 1.25" U-bends that were set aside for my H*nd@, but I didn't feel like spending anymore than I had to. This project was priority as the boss decided to pack up and go back to Canada.

Fabricating these pipes were wayyy easier than I thought. The U bends fit nice and snug in the heads and I cut the inside pipe to keep the bend close to the head.





I marked the pipe in relation to a mark on the head with a sharpie so fitting the pipes on and off will get a perfect line up.





Then cut the other end of the U bend to stop just at the end of the head so the pipe doesn't interfere with the velocity stack on the carb.





I stepped the 1.25 pipe to a 1.75" pipe. Mitch called this his "anti-reversion" which keeps back pressure up with high flowing pipes. I told him that he was full of shit and that the lip of the smaller pipe works THAT efficiently.

Don't ask me why I still decided to make the pipes that way...I don't really know.

The thing that is clamped in the vice was made to slip the pipe over and bend the ends in to meet the smaller pipe, with a hammer of course. (Mitch didn't want me giving away 'secrets', but if you are reading this, SUE ME. That's what you get for moving out of California!)








Ok, I used the 1.75 pipe because the mufflers I got with the triumph pipes fits well.... and I kinda believe the anti-reversion shit after some of the wild pipes I've seen the boss-man make.





Laugh all you want, but before I wrapped the pipes, I burned the LIVING FUCK out of my thigh. It also doubles as a heat shield for the heads. Yeah, I don't like the look or the black paint either, but It's a budget build.





Victory is close.





Now, down to paint and final assembly. I'll post that later. I'll be fucked if the boss finds me screwin' on the computer...again.
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Old 10-26-2010, 02:33 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by 1332bobber View Post
Agreed. Every time I see someone doing this it makes me want to learn to bend tube and TIG weld. I really like the OIF frames, but nothing says awesome like the featherbed frame. Home built to boot. Nice man. Nice!

Thanks! I used one of these basic set-ups: JD2 Tube Bender
We had the non-hydraulic version, so the machine used a long bar for leverage. Check YouTube for how-to videos which is what I did before starting the frame. The best advice I can give is "measure twice, bend once."

TIG welding is fun after you get the hang of it. I despise my MIG welder after learning TIG. I will eventually step up to one at home, but those welders are fucking 'spensive. There's also write ups and how-to videos but the best way is screwin' around with scrap metal, then step up to bigger things. It was extremely intimidating before I'd start welding on a show bike since everything had to be perfect and the welds were visible. I'd spend 10 minutes "warming up" on scrap then move over to the big stuff. After 6-8 months I would be able to start welding without warming up, but it was still intimidating.

Last edited by thegreasepit; 10-26-2010 at 02:42 PM. Reason: fixes
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Old 10-26-2010, 03:09 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nottso View Post
I'm convinced you're a maniac.


That's not a bad thing.
It's hard to be humble with compliments like this. I thank you, sir.



So, I left off with the exhaust... now I'll move onto the rear-sets.

I started off with a set of Harley passenger pegs that I bought 2 sets of off eBay for 4 or 5 bucks. Spent $15 on peg clevis mounts from Drag Specialties and went to work shaping the pedals and linkage.

I used shock bushings as spacers/bushings and shaped the pedals out of 1 1/4x 1/4 aluminum. The linkage is a modified Sportster forward control linkage. I tossed them in a vice and bent them to fit around the transmission. The shifter pedal is crude but works damn well and super smooth.




I'm bummed that I cannot find any pictures of the process making the rear-sets. Fuck, I KNOW I took tons of pictures.

Guess I can start posting pics of the paint, assembly.

Here's after 3 coats of Rustoleum Professional Primer. I don't use any other paint than the Professional series from Rustoleum as it is nearly bulletproof. Expensive, yes, but it holds up better than any thing.

After the 4th coat of gloss black Professional paint. After the paint was cured, I sanded it down with 1k and 2k grit, then polished with some rubbing compound. After a tally of cost, I spent about $20 for this:












I wont show you detail, but my girlfriend-at-the-time was excited to see this bike come together and wanted to help. She must have zoned out and let my frame slip off the lifts and put some chips on the paint.
Our breakup was not related to this incident, but if I was in any other state, I would be grounds for murder. I did throw quite a fit though. You would too!!!

For those with a strong stomach, click here

More assembly




Engine in. For a brit twin, that damn thing is HEAVY. I nuts dropped 3 feet picking that bastard up.








Good timing... my box of chrome came in after 4 MONTHS. I wanted to keep all the original stuff and I hated to just paint it. Looks good!






The only parts on this bike that I have not touched, modified, painted, polished, and just kept original are the exhaust clamps. They are exactly the same way as I pulled them off the basket case.












More photos and video later.
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Old 10-26-2010, 03:21 PM   #19
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I might have missed it, but the featherbeds use a head steady from the back of head tube, to the frame, then to the engine to tie it all together. Without it, featherbeds will flex.
Looks good, very nice work, but without diagrams, measurements or a frame to copy to get the geometry right, will it handle like a featherbed?
If I was going to build a featherbed from scratch, I would have built a wideline, but the slimlines are actually more comfortable
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Old 10-26-2010, 04:09 PM   #20
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I might have missed it, but the featherbeds use a head steady from the back of head tube, to the frame, then to the engine to tie it all together. Without it, featherbeds will flex.
Looks good, very nice work, but without diagrams, measurements or a frame to copy to get the geometry right, will it handle like a featherbed?
If I was going to build a featherbed from scratch, I would have built a wideline, but the slimlines are actually more comfortable
Mmmm. Do you have any pictures of the head-steady?

Surprisingly this bike is very, very nimble and very steady, but having never ridden on a featherbed, there is nothing to compare it to. I originally planned to have this frame powdercoated, but decided to rattle can it in the event that the frame needs mending or modifying.

Clubman Racing sells them but has no pictures
Google showed no pictures but this one

Keep in mind, I've never seen this part before and the pictures I found to copy my frame from never had it. I had no idea, but thanks for the heads-up anyway.
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