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Old 11-27-2007, 11:12 PM   #21
RAZ
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Default Re: Home made workshop tools

F.st.m. can you give us some more detail on the phase converter?
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Old 11-28-2007, 09:15 AM   #22
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Default Re: Home made workshop tools

Sure Raz,

First single phase (2 hot legs) enters the knife switch box at the bottom of the box. Leg #2 is jumped(split) to power up what will become the third leg. Time-delay fuses are installed so that the breaker doesn't trip during initial start-up.



Then the third leg power is sent down to a start capacitor. It returns up and into the momentary (light switch) switch. It then goes down and "bump starts" the idler motor which is bolted to the side of my mill.

With zero load on the idler motor, it creates a steady third leg (L3) which can now be used by the mill & lathe.



Though still a bit messy, the circuits can be identified on the wall board in this last photo. When running only one machine, the circuits (L1, L2, & l3) are very well ballanced and the "created 3rd leg" is at 92% - 96% amperage which is just about perfect. When running both(mill & lathe) machines simultaneously, amperage on L3 drops to 88% so I just plug in to the dayton run cap (blue star in photo) and this brings it back up to 95%.



Total expenses were $80 this includes the idler motor(ebay), fuses, romex, capacitors, and light switch. The knife switch came with the mill when I got it, so that was a freebie.
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Old 11-28-2007, 10:15 AM   #23
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Default Re: Home made workshop tools

I converted a 9" benchtop drill press into a makeshift vertical lathe for polishing aluminum tubing.A live center on the bottom & a bow roller off a boat trailer that I cut in half & reshaped on the top.

Last edited by Jeff L; 04-05-2014 at 06:33 PM.
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Old 11-28-2007, 12:34 PM   #24
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Default Re: Home made workshop tools

Quote:
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I converted a 9" benchtop drill press into a makeshift vertical lathe for polishing aluminum tubing.A live center on the bottom & a bow roller off a boat trailer that I cut in half & reshaped on the top.
OH HEY!! That's a great idea!!!
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Old 11-28-2007, 09:23 PM   #25
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Default Re: Home made workshop tools

Quote:
Originally Posted by F.St.M. View Post
Sure Raz,

First single phase (2 hot legs) enters the knife switch box at the bottom of the box. Leg #2 is jumped(split) to power up what will become the third leg. Time-delay fuses are installed so that the breaker doesn't trip during initial start-up.



Then the third leg power is sent down to a start capacitor. It returns up and into the momentary (light switch) switch. It then goes down and "bump starts" the idler motor which is bolted to the side of my mill.

With zero load on the idler motor, it creates a steady third leg (L3) which can now be used by the mill & lathe.



Though still a bit messy, the circuits can be identified on the wall board in this last photo. When running only one machine, the circuits (L1, L2, & l3) are very well ballanced and the "created 3rd leg" is at 92% - 96% amperage which is just about perfect. When running both(mill & lathe) machines simultaneously, amperage on L3 drops to 88% so I just plug in to the dayton run cap (blue star in photo) and this brings it back up to 95%.



Total expenses were $80 this includes the idler motor(ebay), fuses, romex, capacitors, and light switch. The knife switch came with the mill when I got it, so that was a freebie.
I have heard of this done before but nobody explained it as well as you have.Nice job ,esp when multible applications are needed.I have printed this and put in my notes for future reference.....Thanks

Last edited by 1fastfx; 11-28-2007 at 09:25 PM. Reason: spelling
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Old 11-28-2007, 10:10 PM   #26
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Default Re: Home made workshop tools

F.St.M.

I applaud your make do creativity, but your electrical installation is a disaster.

Get an enclosure for those live parts before someone gets zapped. Those lugs are an electrocution hazzard, especially with either motor under load.
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Old 11-29-2007, 12:07 AM   #27
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Default Re: Home made workshop tools

Here is my home made mill, back in trade school each of us made parts and then we all put them together and we each had a mill.
Chad
www.pearsoncustoms.com
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Old 11-29-2007, 12:31 AM   #28
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Default Re: Home made workshop tools

wheeling machines, got plans off internet, made two one paid for
mine.
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Old 11-29-2007, 09:59 AM   #29
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Default Re: Home made workshop tools

a stand for holding stuff, the arms adjust vert. and horizontaly




neck fixture for an as yet unfinished frame jig





probably too dark to see but a combo wheel chock / tie down




over center bike lift



some mods to a HF tubing notcher

kids in shop class using a T-dolly


this table has been one of the most useful things ever, has casters and makes moving things around the shop super easy, a '26 roadster is sitting on it now and I just push it around the shop


homemade Les Paul
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Old 11-30-2007, 09:01 AM   #30
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Default Re: Home made workshop tools

The thing was actually pretty decent for a HF tool right out of the box. The only things I did were mount it to a good heavy base (I built a wood one first but the 1/4" steel plate is much better). The biggest problem I found is that the pipe clamp didnt quite line up with quill, hole would be drilled off center. All I had to do was put some shim stock between the pipe clamp (the black piece) and the frame (the gray piece) to line it up. I think the biggest secret to making it work is good hole saws.
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Old 12-15-2007, 10:43 PM   #31
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Default Re: Home made workshop tools

Just found this online... Guy says its for forming tunnels for bike gas tanks.
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Old 12-15-2007, 10:53 PM   #32
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Default Re: Home made workshop tools

I use this tool to pressure test my intake manifold. Super easy to find even the smallest leaks.



  1. Remove the carb
  2. Bolt this onto the end of the intake using the rubber inner tube "gasket" to seal it up.
  3. Put my air compressor hose on the nipple and adjust the regulator to 10psi.
  4. Spray all around the intake o-rings with water with a little bit of dish soap.
If you have a leak, you'll get lots of bubbles. Much more reliable way to find intake leaks then spraying around the intake with WD40 or carb cleaner.

-Craig

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Old 12-15-2007, 11:03 PM   #33
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Good Idea, I need to make one of those
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Old 09-25-2008, 09:10 AM   #34
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I've been in the mood to make some items for the garage. I'll get pics of my metal brakes, english wheel, and parts washer and post them up. In the mean time....bump.
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Old 09-26-2008, 01:10 AM   #35
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Default Re: Home made workshop tools

great scott 1.21 jigawatts
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F.st.m. can you give us some more detail on the phase converter?
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Old 09-26-2008, 07:50 AM   #36
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Default Re: Home made workshop tools

Quote:
Originally Posted by VA Rebel View Post
F.St.M.

I applaud your make do creativity, but your electrical installation is a disaster.

Get an enclosure for those live parts before someone gets zapped. Those lugs are an electrocution hazzard, especially with either motor under load.
I usualy try to avoid licking the live lugs on the wall when I'm machining something, so enclosing them is not a concern.
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Old 09-26-2008, 08:26 AM   #37
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great scott 1.21 jigawatts
It still amazes me that "Doc" Brown could build a time machine, but lack the necessary skills to pronounce gigawatt....
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Old 09-26-2008, 10:52 AM   #38
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When you build time machines at 60 years old, who has the time to learn spelling and pronunciations.
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Old 09-26-2008, 12:18 PM   #39
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Default Re: Home made workshop tools

My "poorman's" wheel clamp. I know, I need to turn the heat up on my welder. Hahaha...





The tried and true 'block of wood' but with channels drilled for a lil' added stability. Clamp a 2x4 to a 6x4 use a 1-3/8" bit at the seam and you get a perfect channel for the frame. 'b'


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Old 09-26-2008, 03:11 PM   #40
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great scott 1.21 jigawatts
Im convinced Doc Brown...errr Fritz...has plans for the flux capacitor buried somewhere in his shop.
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